One-Hit Wonders of the ’80s: 1981 – Joey Scarbury

“Theme from The Greatest American Hero (Believe It or Not)” by Joey Scarbury

In a decade filled with great television theme songs, the theme from The Greatest American was among the best. In the late ’70s Joey Scarbury began working for producer and composer Mike Post. Post was hired along with Stephen Geyer to write the theme tune for a new TV series titled The Greatest American Hero.

After recording the full-length version of the song, entitled “Believe It or Not”, it was edited down to a minute for broadcast as the theme song for the show. The show became successful, and everybody loved the song. So the song was released as a single, and peaked at #2 on August 15, 1981. Scarbury could not follow up the song’s success. He did team up with Mike Post again to record “Back to Back”, which was the theme song for Hardcastle and McCormick.

Here was Scarbury’s more famous tune:

Remember That Song? – 9/23/11

Can you name the artist and song and complete the lyrics:

You get to talk to a pretty girl.
She’s everything you dream about
___ ____ ____ __ ____


Last Song: “Crimson and Clover” by Joan Jett and the Blackhearts

Ah, now I don’t hardly know her
But I think I could love her
Crimson and Clover

One-Hit Wonders of the ’80s: 1981 – Grover Washington, Jr.

“Just the Two of Us” by Grover Washington, Jr.

“Just the Two of Us” was recorded by Grover Washington, Jr. and Bill Withers. The song appeared on Washington’s album Winelight. It reached number two on the Billboard Hot 100, and stayed there for 3 weeks. The song won a Grammy Award for Best R&B Song.

Grover Washington, Jr. (December 12, 1943 – December 17, 1999) was an jazz-funk/soul-jazz saxophonist. He did not have another hit after “Just the Two of Us”, but he remained an influence in smooth jazz, and is known for bringing Kenny G to the forefront

On December 17, 1999, while waiting in the green room after taping four songs for The Saturday Early Show, at CBS Studios in New York City, Washington collapsed. He was taken to St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at about 7:30 p.m. He was 56 years old. His doctors determined that he had suffered a massive heart attack.

He did leave us with this nice smooth hit:

Remember That Song? – 9/22/11

Name the song (which is the missing lyrics) and artist [Hint: this is a cover song]:

Ah, now I don’t hardly know her
But I think I could love her
_______ ___ ______


Last Song: “Parents Just Don’t Understand” by D.J. Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince:

And then she lost her mind and did the ultimate
I asked her for Adidas and she bought me zips!

R.E.M. Calls it Quits

Geez, I hope the fact that I listed their song “Stand” as the #5 worst hit of the ’80s didn’t break the band up! The following is from their official web site:

“To our Fans and Friends: As R.E.M., and as lifelong friends and co-conspirators, we have decided to call it a day as a band. We walk away with a great sense of gratitude, of finality, and of astonishment at all we have accomplished. To anyone who ever felt touched by our music, our deepest thanks for listening.” R.E.M.

In their own words: The guys share their thoughts on why now.

MIKE

“During our last tour, and while making Collapse Into Now and putting together this greatest hits retrospective, we started asking ourselves, ‘what next’? Working through our music and memories from over three decades was a hell of a journey. We realized that these songs seemed to draw a natural line under the last 31 years of our working together.

“We have always been a band in the truest sense of the word. Brothers who truly love, and respect, each other. We feel kind of like pioneers in this–there’s no disharmony here, no falling-outs, no lawyers squaring-off. We’ve made this decision together, amicably and with each other’s best interests at heart. The time just feels right.”

MICHAEL

“A wise man once said–‘the skill in attending a party is knowing when it’s time to leave.’ We built something extraordinary together. We did this thing. And now we’re going to walk away from it.

“I hope our fans realize this wasn’t an easy decision; but all things must end, and we wanted to do it right, to do it our way.

“We have to thank all the people who helped us be R.E.M. for these 31 years; our deepest gratitude to those who allowed us to do this. It’s been amazing.”

PETER

“One of the things that was always so great about being in R.E.M. was the fact that the records and the songs we wrote meant as much to our fans as they did to us. It was, and still is, important to us to do right by you. Being a part of your lives has been an unbelievable gift. Thank you.

“Mike, Michael, Bill, Bertis, and I walk away as great friends. I know I will be seeing them in the future, just as I know I will be seeing everyone who has followed us and supported us through the years. Even if it’s only in the vinyl aisle of your local record store, or standing at the back of the club: watching a group of 19 year olds trying to change the world.”

ATHENS, GA–(Marketwire – Sep 21, 2011)

“During our last tour, and while making Collapse Into Now and putting together this greatest hits retrospective; we started to ask ourselves ‘what next?’,” commented Mike Mills. “Working through our music and memories from over three decades was a hell of a journey. We realized that these songs seemed to draw a natural line under the last 31 years of our working together. The time just feels right.”

R.E.M. is unique in that they are very much still the group of friends from Athens, Georgia that they’ve been since the band formed in 1979. While their career has spanned 15 studio albums and huge global success, the band itself only ever comprised the four original members. The one person to leave this tight-knit group was drummer Bill Berry, who retired two years after suffering a brain aneurysm on-stage during 1995’s “Monster” tour. But not before extracting a promise from his band mates that they would continue on as R.E.M.: “Bill insisted he would stay, if his leaving meant breaking the band up,” remembers Michael Stipe.

Mills adds: “We have always been a band in the truest sense of the word. Brothers who truly love and respect each other. We feel kind of like pioneers in this — there’s no disharmony here, no falling-outs, no lawyers squaring off. We’ve made this decision together, amicably and with each other’s best interests at heart.”

“A wise man once said — ‘the skill in attending a party is knowing when it’s time to leave,” agrees Michael Stipe. “We built something extraordinary together. We did this thing. And now we’re going to walk away from it. I hope our fans realize this wasn’t an easy decision; but all things must end; and we wanted to do it right, to do it our way. We have to thank all the people who helped us be R.E.M. for these 31 years, our deepest gratitude to those who allowed us to do this. It’s been amazing.”

Buck picks up on his thoughts: “One of the things that was always so great about being in R.E.M., was the fact that the records we made and the songs we wrote, meant as much to our fans as they did to us. It was, and still is, important to us to do right by them. Being a part of their lives has been an unbelievable gift.

“Mike, Michael, Bill, Bertis, and I walk away as great friends. I know I will be seeing them in the future, just as I know I will be seeing everyone that has followed and supported us through the years. Even if it’s only in the vinyl aisle of your local record store, or standing at the back of a club; watching a group of 19-year-olds trying to change the world.”

R.E.M. will release a career-spanning Greatest Hits album through Warner Brothers in November. More information to follow.

One Hit Wonders of the ’80s: 1980 – The Rest

“With You I’m Born Again”
by Syreeta
peaked at #4 on April 19, 1980

“Set Me Free”
by Utopia
peaked at #27 on April 19, 1980

“The Seduction (Love Theme from American Gigolo)”
by James Last Band
peaked at #28 on May 24, 1980

“Should’ve Never Let You Go”
by Dara Sedaka
peaked at #19 on May 31, 1980

“Wondering Where the Lions Are”
by Bruce Cockburn
peaked at #21 on June 7, 1980

“New Romance (It’s a Mystery)”
by Spider
peaked at #39 on June 7, 1980

“King of the Hill”
by Rick Pinette and Oak
peaked at #36 on July 19, 1980

“A Lover’s Holiday”
by Change
peaked at #40 on July 19, 1980

“Tired of Toein’ the Line”
by Rocky Burnette
peaked at #8 on July 26, 1980

“Take Your Time (Do It Right) Part 1”
by The S.O.S. Band
peaked at #3 on August 16, 1980

“Take a Little Rhythm”
by Ali Thomson
peaked at #15 on August 23, 1980

“One in a Million You”
by Larry Graham
peaked at #9 on September 20, 1980

“How Do I Survive”
by Amy Holland
peaked at #22 on October 11, 1980

“Who’ll Be the Fool Tonight”
by The Larsen-Feiten Band
peaked at #29 on October 11, 1980

“I’m Happy That Love Has Found You”
by Jimmy Hall
peaked at #27 on November 22, 1980

“Everybody’s Got to Learn Sometime”
by The Korgis
peaked at #18 on December 27, 1980

Daily Trivia – 9/21/11

Question: What beach town near L.A. was home to Jack, Janet and Chrissy’s pad on Three’s Company?


Last Question: What beer ran U.S. ads with a slogan mistranslated into Spanish as “filling, and less delicious”?

Answer: Miller Lite

Lite Beer from Miller; everything you’ve always wanted in a beer…and less

Miller Lite’s long-running “Great Taste…Less Filling!” advertising campaign was ranked by Advertising Age magazine as the 8th-best advertising campaign in history. However, according to Time Magazine, in an attempt to appeal to Spanish-speaking Americans, they ventured into Spanglish to promote their beer – which translated into “filling, and less delicious”

But the commercials were great as they starred many actors and athletes. Sometimes the commercials were more entertaining than the shows that they were interrupting. Here is a great example: