Category Archives: Movies

Trivia Tuesday – 11/9/10

Question: What television show featured a time traveler whose job it was to travel throughout Earth’s past, present, and future fixing “mistakes” in time. (It’s not Doctor Who or Quantum Leap)


Last Week’s Question: What was the date in 1955 that Marty arrived on in Back to the Future?

Answer: November 5

Marty McFly used the DeLorean time machine to escape Libyan terrorists and accidentally traveled back in time to the very day Dr. Emmett L. Brown conceived of the possibility of time travel: Nov. 5, 1955. Where the Twin Pines Mall would someday stand, Marty arrived at the Twin Pines Ranch and crashed into Otis Peabody’s barn.

Trivia Tuesday – 11/2/10

Question: What was the date in 1955 that Marty arrived on in Back to the Future?


Last Week’s Question: What 2 things does “Basket Case” Allison (Ally Sheedy) add to her sandwich?

Answer: Cap’n Crunch and Pixie Stix (or sugar)

This was a very funny scene in the movie. Not only was she eating this “sugar” sandwich, but she was also drinking a regular Coke with it. I’ve never tried that. But, maybe I will one of these days if I’m really tired at work! Here is the scene:

Trivia Tuesday – 10/26/10

Question: What 2 things does “Basket Case” Allison (Ally Sheedy) add to her sandwich?


Last Week’s Question: In the video for ‘Time After Time’, where do Cyndi Lauper and her boyfriend live?

Answer: In a camper

“Time After Time” was the second single released off of Cyndi’s debut album, She’s So Unusual. The song reached number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart on June 9, 1984. Lauper’s mother, brother, and then-boyfriend David Wolff appear in the video, and Lou Albano, who played her father in the “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” video, can be seen as a cook. The song has been covered by dozens and dozens of artists, ranging from Jazz legend Miles Davis to Willie Nelson to Ashley Tisdale. I like the song a lot now. But, when it came out I got sick of it quickly as it was on MTV Time After Time After Time After Time After Time After Time….

Trivia Tuesday – 10/12/10

Question: What actress played Laura and Almonzo’s niece on Little House on the Prairie?


Last Week’s Question: In “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” who plays the burnout at the police station that Jeanie kisses?

Answer: Charlie Sheen

This was a very funny scene in the movie. Ferris’s sister Jeanie (Dirty Dancing‘s Jennifer Grey) catches the principal, Mr. Rooney (Jeffrey Jones) sneaking around her house to bust Ferris. Jeanie kicked Mr. Rooney in the face, then ran upstairs to call the cops. Mr. Rooney took off, and Jeanie was arrested for prank calling the police.
While Mrs. Bueller is in the back of the station talking to the police, Jeanie is sitting next to Charlie Sheen’s drug addict, and annoys the crap out of her. And it didn’t help that he heard of Ferris, and implied that he admired him. Jeanie, got really annoyed, and Sheen tells her that she needs to stop worrying so much about Ferris and more about herself. All of a sudden they were kissing when the mother came out. Mrs. Bueller then dragged Jeanie out of the station.

Star Wars saga is set to go with 3D

Well, it has been a long time coming. Star Wars fans should not be surprised to hear that the entire saga will be released in 3D. According to The Hollywood Reporter, the films will be rereleased in 3D beginning in 2012, starting with Episode I: The Phantom Menace. After that, each film would be released in order at the same time in consecutive years, depending on how well the first rerelease does.

In the meantime, Lucas plans a comprehensive Blu-ray Disc set of the six films next year, which would include upgraded picture and sound quality, new deleted scenes and special features.

If the movies stay on schedule, and are released every year, then Return of the Jedi will be released in 2017. And that means fanboys will finally get to see the moment they’ve been waiting for. Jabba the Hutt in 3D!!! Oh yeah, and Princess Lea will be in her slave outfit in 3D.

19 Somethin’

1200px-star_wars_logo-svgIn 2002, country music singer Mark Wills released a song called 19 Somethin’. It was written by David Lee and Chris DuBois, and it is basically a “We Didn’t Start the Fire” type of song that makes pop culture references from our generation (late ’70s early ’80s). It spent six weeks at #1 on the Hot Country Songs chart in early 2003, and was the #2 country song of the Decade on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs Chart.

This song happened to come up on my iPod this week. I have somewhere around 7,000 songs on my iPod, so I had forgotten about this one.

So, in this series, I will write about each line of the song. At the end of this article, you can watch the video of the song.

As you can tell from the logo, you can see what the first line is about:

I Saw Star Wars at least eight times

To say that this movie had an impact on my life, (and on most kid’s lives) when this was released, would be an understatement. I’m not going to bother going through a summary of the movie.

This was the first movie that I can remember seeing in the theater. And at this point, I have seen this a tad more than eight times. I haven’t listened to most of the songs I love as many times as I have seen Star Wars.

To this day, if I hear the 20th Century Fox theme, and it is not followed by the Lucasfilm Ltd logo, then:

then I am very disappointed!

Star Wars changed movie making as it changed special effects forever. It also spawned off many space/science fiction movies, such as Battlestar Galactica, The Black Hole, and it got the Star Trek franchise going again.

It also changed the toy industry. I don’t think there were small action figures before this. I had a big G.I. Joe figure, and a Six Million Dollar Man figure (where you could look through a spot in the back of his head, and see out his eye for bionic vision, and you could roll the skin on his arm back to see the bionics there).
But now there were small action figures of everybody in the movie – even the characters that were in the movie for 2 seconds (R5-D4 or Hammerhead anyone?). And of course there were figures of the main characters:

I think I had almost all of them from the original movie. And there were the ships. There was the X-Wing fighter where you push down on R2-D2’s head, and the wings opened up:

And then there were the sequels. Some (including me) would even argue that the second movie – The Empire Strikes Back – was the best of the franchise.

And then the prequels were released from 1999-2004. A lot of people from my generation complained about them, but I liked them a lot. And it introduced a brand new generation to the movies we loved. And now there is the Clone Wars series on the Cartoon Network. So now there is an even newer generation being introduced to Star Wars.
And weren’t we curious about the Clone Wars ever since Obi-Wan mentioned them quickly in the original movie?

There have also been Star Wars books, comic books and video games. Basically, Star Wars will live forever. And most of us have been there from the very beginning.

Now, enjoy the song 19 Somethin’ by Mark Wills:

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Ronald Reagan movie planned for 2011

The following article is from Reuters:

The story of Ronald Reagan’s life — from boyhood to Hollywood actor to leader of the free world — is about to spill out on the big screen in a way quite different from the miniseries that caused such a stir seven years ago.

The feature film, titled “Reagan” and sporting a $30 million production budget, is set for release late next year and will be based on two best-selling biographies of the 40th U.S. president by Paul Kengor: “The Crusader” and “God and Ronald Reagan.”

Jonas McCord, who was not a Reagan fan, wrote the script. “I was of the opinion that at best he was a bad actor and at worst a clown,” McCord said.

But the scribe, whose credits include “Malice” and “The Body,” said he was drawn to the project as he researched the former president’s upbringing. He described Reagan’s childhood as “a surreal Norman Rockwell painting with his alcoholic Catholic father, devout Christian mother, Catholic brother and ever-changing boarders the family took in.”

The film will begin with the 1981 assassination attempt and tell Reagan’s story through flashbacks and flash-forwards. No actors or director have been signed.

Hollywood’s last attempt to depict Reagan was the 2003 miniseries “The Reagans,” which starred James Brolin. It was supposed to air on CBS until a controversy erupted over alleged left-wing bias and it was relegated to sibling premium cable outlet Showtime. It was seen by 1.2 million people.

“Only in Hollywood could you make an insulting, condescending movie about a much-loved historical figure, hire an actor who loathes the man, watch it flop and then somehow conclude that Americans don’t want to see a movie about him,” said producer Mark Joseph, who optioned the books four years ago.

“I watched Americans line up and wait for 10 hours for the simple privilege of passing by his closed casket. They love this man,” added Joseph, a marketing and development executive who worked on “Ray” and “The Passion of the Christ.”

He has partnered on the project with Ralph Winter, whose producing credits include four “X-Men” movies, two “Fantastic Four” movies and the 2001 remake of “Planet of the Apes.”

The producers are considering two distribution offers as they complete a final round of funding. They have created the production company Rawhide Pictures, an homage to the Secret Service code name for Reagan.

The Breakfast Club

Most schools are going back in session this week, with some even starting today. In that spirit, here is another entry to the Back to School series. We will talk about the greatest school movie of the ’80s, and maybe of all time – The Breakfast Club:

In 8 hours and 54 minutes, students from different high school social groups, struggled then bonded with each other, as they spent a Saturday in detention together. Did schools really have detentions on Saturdays?
Anyway, the five students at fictional Shermer High School in Shermer, Illinois were to spend their detention in the school library and ordered not to speak or move from their seats by the antagonistic principal, Richard Vernon (Paul Gleason). He assigns a 1,000 word essay in which each student must write about who he or she thinks he or she is.

The students were:
John Bender (Judd Nelson) – The Rebel
Claire Standish (Molly Ringwald) – The Snob
Andrew Clark (Emilio Estevez) – The Jock
Brian Johnson (Anthony Michael Hall) – The Geek
Allison Reynolds (Ally Sheedy) – The Outcast

Bender stirred up trouble with the other students, but managed to get them to open up about themselves. Brian and Andrew had a lot of pressure on them to be a great student and athlete, respectively. And Bender was abused by his father, with a cigar burn to prove it.

They were in detention for the following reasons:

Andrew taped a students buttocks together
Claire ditched class to go to the mall
Brian brought a flare gun to school and it went off in his locker
Bender pulled the fire alarm
and the best one:
Allison had nothing better to do

John Hughes wrote this great movie in just 2 days. He also had a cameo as he played Brian’s father.

And who could forget the great song for the movie – “Don’t You (Forget About Me)” by Simple Minds? You can’t think of this song without thinking of the movie and vice versa.

Here are some other facts about the movie:
Emilio Estevez was originally going to play Bender, but Hughes couldn’t find someone to play Andrew Clark so Emilio agreed to play Clark.

Molly Ringwald really wanted to play Allison but Ally Sheedy had already been promised the part.

Nicolas Cage was originally considered for the role of John Bender but the production couldn’t afford his salary at the time. John Cusack was originally cast as John Bender, but John Hughes decided to replace him with Judd Nelson before shooting began.

The scene in which all characters sit in a circle on the floor in the library and tell stories about why they were in detention was not scripted. John Hughes told them all to ad-lib.

Other proposed titles were “The Lunch Bunch” and “Library Revolution”.

The switchblade used in the movie actually belonged to Judd Nelson. He explained that he had it for protection purposes.

At the time of shooting, Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall were the only Breakfast Club members of high school age, both being 17. Emilio Estevez and Ally Sheedy both were 23, and Judd Nelson was 26.

Emilio Estevez, Judd Nelson, and Ally Sheedy played high school students in this film, the same year that they would portray college graduates in St. Elmo’s Fire (1985).

And here are some quotes from the movie:

[Claire is doing Allison’s make-up.]
Claire: You know, you look a lot better without all that black shit under your eyes.
Allison: Hey, I like all that black shit… Why are you being so nice to me?
Claire: Because you’re letting me.


Allison Reynolds: Your middle name is Ralph, as in puke, your birthdate’s March 12th, you’re 5’9 and a half, you weigh 130 pounds and your social security number is 049380913.
Andrew Clark: Wow! Are you psychic?
Allison Reynolds: No.
Brian Johnson: Well, would you mind telling me how you know all this about me?
Allison Reynolds: I stole your wallet.


John Bender (to the principal): Does Barry Manilow know that you raid his wardrobe?


Bender: I just wanna know how one becomes a janitor because Andrew here is very interested in pursuing a career in the custodial arts.


John Bender: Brian, this is a very nutritious lunch. All the food groups are represented. Did your mom marry Mr. Rogers?
Brian Johnson: Uh, no. Mr. Johnson.


Andrew Clark: You don’t have any goals.
John Bender: Oh but I do.
Andrew Clark: Yeah?
John Bender: I wanna be just like you. I figure all I need, is a lobotomy and some tights.
Brian Johnson: You wear tights?
Andrew Clark: No I don’t wear tights. I wear the required uniform.
Brian Johnson: Tights.
Andrew Clark: Shut up.


John Bender: Sporto.
Andrew Clark: What?
John Bender: You get along with your parents?
Andrew Clark: Well, if I say yes I’m an idiot, right?
John Bender: You’re an idiot anyway. But if you say you get along with your parents, well, you’re a liar too.


Brian Johnson: Dear Mr. Vernon: We accept the fact that we had to sacrifice a whole Saturday in detention for whatever it is we did wrong, but we think you’re crazy for making us write an essay telling you who we think we are. You see us as you want to see us: in the simplest terms, in the most convenient definitions. But what we found out is that each one of us is a brain, and an athlete, and a basket case, a princess, and a criminal. Does that answer your question? Sincerely yours, The Breakfast Club.

So, what social group were you in. This is anonymous, so don’t be shy!
You can even be in more than one.

Did you have any favorite parts of the movie that you would like to bring up? Let us know.

Friday the 13th

Today is Friday the 13th, and that made me think of the movie Friday the 13th. The original was relased 30 years ago this past May 9th.

The original was inspired by the success of John Carpenter’s Halloween, and it kicked the horror movie genre into overdrive in the ’80s. It made Camp Crystal Lake a household name.
Here is a description of the movie that I found, and I believe is accurate:


The movie opens in 1958 as two summer camp counselors at Camp Crystal Lake, Barry (Willie Adams) and Claudette (Debra S. Hayes), sneak away from a campfire sing-along to have sex. Before they can completely undress, an unseen assailant sneaks into the room and murders them both.

Move forward to Friday, June 13, 1980. A young woman named Annie (Robbi Morgan) enters a small diner and asks for directions to Camp Crystal Lake, much to the shock of the restaurant’s patrons and staff. Enos (Rex Everhart), a truck driver from the diner, agrees to give her a lift halfway to the camp. A strange old man named Ralph (Walt Gorney) reacts to the news of the camp’s reopening by warning Annie that they are all doomed. During the drive, Enos warns her about the camp, informing her that a young boy drowned in Crystal Lake in 1957, one year before the double murders occurred, followed by several fires and poisoned water. After Enos lets her out, Annie hitches another ride in a Jeep. The second driver, whose face is never seen, murders Annie by slashing her throat with a large hunting knife after her futile efforts to escape.

At the camp, the other counselors, Ned (Mark Nelson), Jack (Kevin Bacon), Bill (Harry Crosby), Marcie (Jeannine Taylor), Brenda (Laurie Bartram), Alice (Adrienne King) and the camp’s owner, Steve Christy (Peter Brouwer), are refurbishing the cabins and facilities. As a violent storm closes in on the horizon, Steve leaves the campgrounds to get more supplies. The unidentified killer begins to isolate and murder the counselors. First Ned, who is lead into a cabin and is killed, then Jack who is impaled in the chest with a spear, and then Marcie, who is trashed in the face with an axe. Meanwhile, Alice, Brenda and Bill are playing strip Monopoly in the main cabin. Brenda soon leaves and goes to her cabin to bed. While in bed, reading a book, she hears a childlike voice outside crying ‘Help me’ several times. As she goes out to investigate, the lights at the archery range suddenly turn on and Brenda is murdered (off-screen). Alice informs Bill that she thinks she heard Brenda screaming and that she saw the lights turn on at the archery range. Alice and Bill leave the cabin to investigate and find a bloody axe in Brenda’s bed. Attempting to phone the police, they discover the phones are dead and, when they try to leave, the car won’t start. Later that evening, Steve returns from town and is also murdered, apparently familiar with his attacker. Back at camp, when the lights go out, Bill goes to check on the power generator. Alice heads out looking for Bill when he doesn’t return. She finds his body pinned to a door by several arrows. Now alone, Alice flees back to the main cabin and hides. After a few moments of silence, Brenda’s corpse is hurled through the window.

Alice hears a vehicle outside the cabin and, thinking it to be Steve, runs out to warn him. Instead, she finds a middle-aged woman who introduces herself as Mrs. Voorhees (Betsy Palmer), stating that she is an “old friend of the Christys”. Alice hysterically tries to tell her about the murders. Mrs. Voorhees expresses horror at the sight of Brenda’s body, but she soon reveals herself to be the mother of the boy who drowned in the lake in 1957, and that today is his birthday. Talking mostly to herself, she blames her son Jason’s drowning on the fact that two counselors were having sex and were unaware of Jason struggling in the lake. Mrs. Voorhees suddenly turns violent and pulls out a knife, rushing at Alice. A lengthy chase ensues, during which Alice flees her attacker and finds Steve and Annie’s bodies in the process. Alice and Mrs. Voorhees have multiple confrontations, each time with Alice believing she has finally beaten Mrs. Voorhees. During their final fight, Alice manages to decapitate Mrs. Voorhees with her own machete.

Afterward, Alice boards a canoe and floats to the middle of the lake. As the sun rises, the decomposing corpse of Mrs. Voorhees’ son, Jason (Ari Lehman), attacks Alice, just as the police arrive. As she is dragged under water, Alice awakens from the nightmare in a hospital, where Sergeant Tierney (Ron Carroll) tells her that they pulled her out of the lake. Alice is informed that everyone is dead; when she asks about Jason, Tierney informs her they never found any boy, which leaves her with the impression that he is still there.


Not only was Friday the 13th influenced by Halloween, but it was similar to Jaws with the scary music whenever the bad guy was around. Jaws had duh-duh-duh-duh and Friday the 13th had the “ki ki ki, ma ma ma” sound.

The movie spawned many sequels. It went to number 11 with the crossover with Nightmare on Elm Street in Freddy vs. Jason. Then in 2009, like the Halloween franchise, the Friday the 13th franchise was rebooted.
The sequel to the reboot was originally supposed to be released today, and it was supposed to be in 3-D. But, that has been changed, and no released date has been set.

One Year Ago Today: An ’80s Legend is Lost

On August 6, 2009, ’80s movies fans, especially those of us who grew up in the ’80s, had our hearts ripped out with the passing of writer/producer/director John Hughes (February 18, 1950 – August 6, 2009).

Hughes died of a heart attack while walking in Manhattan, where he was visiting his family. On that morning, Hughes was on West 55th Street in Manhattan when he was stricken with chest pains. At 8:55 a.m., 911 operators summoned paramedics to assist. Hughes was unconscious when they arrived several minutes later. Hughes was raced to Roosevelt Hospital, where he was later pronounced dead. Not only was his death at a relatively young age tragic, but it was tragic that it happened in New York, and not his beloved Chicago.

Hughes got his start writing for the National Lampoon Magazine. His first credited screenplay was Class Reunion, which wasn’t too successful. But he skyrocketed when he wrote the screenplay for National Lampoon’s Vacation.

The first movie he directed was the classic Sixteen Candles. This began a string of very successful movies set around high school – The Breakfast Club, Pretty in Pink, Weird Science and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.

Then to avoid being known solely known for teen comedies, he branched out in 1987, directing Planes, Trains & Automobiles starring Steve Martin and John Candy, and Uncle Buck, also starring John Candy.

Then his biggest success came with the movie Home Alone, which is still the most successful live-action comedy of all time. Then his last film as a director was 1991’s Curly Sue, which I have never seen.

Hughes stepped away from Hollywood in 1994. This was the same year John Candy died. If Candy did not die, who knows if Hughes may have come back or not.

Hughes made stars out of Molly Ringwald, Anthony Michael Hall, Judd Nelson, Ally Sheedy, Jon Cryer, Macaulay Culkin, and Alec Baldwin.

His teen movies were incredible. Teens in the ’80s could totally relate to at least some of the characters in his movies. Most of the characters were were awkward and uncomfortable in their own skin. But, his movies managed to have happy endings.

Something that Hughes did, that is greatly missed today, is the way he integrated music in his movies. Who can forget Ducky dancing and singing to “Try a Little Tenderness” in the record store, or Ferris in the parade performing “Twist and Shout”. And you can’t help but think of the song “Don’t You Forget About Me” when mentioning John Hughes.

Here is my top 5 John Hughes movies:
5. Sixteen Candles
4. Uncle Buck
3. Ferris Bueller’s Day Off
2. Planes, Trains & Automobiles
1. The Breakfast Club

What are some of your favorite John Hughes movies, moments or memories?

Here is a poll to select your favorite John Hughes movie that he actually directed:

In closing, as the great Ferris Bueller said: “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”