Category Archives: Olympics

Return to the ’80s Trivia – 8/9/21

rtt80s trivia

Question: In Pee-wee’s Big Adventure (which was released on this date in 1985), where does Madame Ruby tell Pee-wee his bike is?


Last Question: Who was the first American to win the “all-around” competition in Olympic women’s gymnastics?

Answer: Mary Lou Retton

mary-lou-retton-e1457112659764usa-mary-lou-retton-1984-summer-olympics-august-13-1984-sports-illustrated-cover

Return to the ’80s Trivia – 8/6/21

rtt80s trivia

Question: Who was the first American to win the “all-around” competition in Olympic women’s gymnastics?


Last Question: On Valerie, who played the family matriarch after actress Valerie Harper left the show?

Answer: Sandy Duncan

hqdefaultDV8NmD3VMAE_wzs

Return to the ’80s Trivia – 7/27/21

rtt80s trivia

Question: What was the first film to feature Paul Reubens as Pee-wee Herman:
A.) Airplane!
B.) The Jerk
C.) Cheech and Chong’s Next Movie


Last Question: Who accused Zola Budd of tripping her in women’s 3,000m final in Los Angeles Olympics 1984?
a) Maricica Puica
b) Mary Decker
c) Wendy Sly
d) Lyn Williams

Answer: b) Mary Decker

Zola-Budd-Mary-Decker-02-GQ-27Jul16_rex_bZola-Budd-Mary-Decker-GQ-27Jul16_rex_b

Return to the ’80s Trivia – 7/23/21

rtt80s trivia

Question: Who accused Zola Budd of tripping her in women’s 3,000m final in Los Angeles Olympics 1984?
a) Maricica Puica
b) Mary Decker
c) Wendy Sly
d) Lyn Williams


Last Question: In 1986, Ralston Purina introduced what breakfast cereal based on a brand of candy that comes in a two-sided box?

Answer: Nerds

045f1e51bdd030025e8e83b38d516690

Daily Trivia: 8/8/12

Question: What former Disney on Parade dancer landed the lead role in the miniseries North and South?


Last Question: What Olympic sprinter was stripped of his 1988 gold medal after testing positive for steroids?

Answer: Ben Johnson

Ben Johnson was born in Jamaica in 1961, and emigrated to Canada in 1976. He would go on to have a fierce rivalry with American sprinter, Carl Lewis.

At the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, Ben Johnson reached the 100 meter finals. He would win the bronze behind Carl Lewis and Sam Graddy. He also won the bronze as part of the 4×100 meter relay team.

In 1985, after eight consecutive losses, Johnson finally beat Carl Lewis. He would also go on to beat Lewis at the 1986 Goodwill Games. By the time of the 1987 World Championships, Johnson had won his four previous races with Lewis and had established himself as the best 100 m sprinter. At Rome, Johnson gained instant world fame and confirmed this status when he beat Lewis for the title, setting a new world record of 9.83 seconds as well, beating Calvin Smith’s former record by a full tenth of a second.

Then without naming names, Lewis said “There are a lot of people coming out of nowhere. I don’t think they are doing it without drugs.” He then called on the sport of track and field to start investigating the abuse of steroids.

On September 24 1988, Johnson beat Lewis in the 100m final at the Olympics n Seoul, lowering his own world record to 9.79 seconds. However, three days later Johnson was disqualified for testing positive for steroids. Carl Lewis had won the silver, but was bumped up to gold after Johnson’s disqualification.

Ben Johnson was suspended until 1991. Then he attempted a comeback. He had failed to qualify for the 1991 World Championships in Tokyo but made the Canadian Olympic team again in 1992 in Barcelona, Spain. He did not do very well at the Olympics as he finished last in the semi-finals.

He found success again in 1993 as he won a 50 meter race and was just 0.04 seconds shy of the world record. However, there was a reason why he became successful once again – once again he was found guilty of doping – this time for excess testosterone. He was then banned for life by the IAAF.

In 1999, Johnson made headlines again when it was revealed that he had been hired by Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi to act as a football coach for his son, Al-Saadi Gaddafi, who wanted to join an Italian soccer/football team. Al-Saadi was able join an Italian team but was fired after one game when he — you guessed it– failed a drug test.

Daily Trivia: 7/31/12

Question: What body part was Nicolas Cage’s lovelorn character missing, in Moonstruck?


Last Question: Who took five stitches in the scalp after smacking his head on the diving board at the 1988 Olympics?

Answer: Greg Louganis (Great job Jim and 80s Hog – @80slegends!)

Greg Louganis dominated the diving world in the ’80s. He won gold medals at the 1984 and 1988 Olympic Games on both the springboard and platform. He is the only male and the second diver in Olympic history to sweep the diving events in consecutive Olympic Games. He had also been the favorite to win the gold in those events in 1980 as well. However, the U.S. boycotted the Olympics that year as they were held in Cold War-era Moscow.

One of the most memorable images of Greg Louganis was in the 1988 Olympics in Seoul when he suffered a concussion after hitting his head on the springboard during the preliminary rounds while performing a reverse 2½ pike. That did not slow him down though. He earned the highest single score of the qualifying rounds on his next dive, and he would go on to win the Gold.

However, there was controversy after that event. It was discovered that 6 months before the Olympics, Louganis was diagnosed as being HIV positive, which he did not disclose. But his blood in the pool actually posed about zero risk. The blood was diluted by thousands of gallons of water, and “chlorine kills HIV”, said Dr. John Ward, chief of HIV-AIDS surveillance at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 1995, Greg Louganis went on Oprah’s show, and announced to the world that he was gay. It was one of Oprah’s top-rated shows and listed as one of her “25 Most Unforgettable Guests”.

Since November 2010, Louganis has been coaching divers of a wide range of ages and abilities in the SoCal Divers Club in Fullerton, California. He is also a mentor to the US diving team at the London 2012 Olympics.

Daily Trivia: 7/30/12

Question: Who took five stitches in the scalp after smacking his head on the diving board at the 1988 Olympics?


Last Question: What women’s track star pioneered the one-legged body suit?

Answer: Florence Griffith-Joyner – a.k.a Flo-Jo (Great job Jim!)

Florence Griffith-Joyner is considered to be the “fastest woman of all time” as she holds the world record for both the 100 meters and 200 meters, both set in 1988 and has never been seriously challenged. She was the wife of triple jumper Al Joyner and the sister-in-law of heptathlete and long jumper Jackie Joyner-Kersee.

“Flo-Jo” was the big favorite for the titles in the sprint events at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul. She did not disappoint! She won the Gold in the 100 meters and 200 meters races, as well as the 4×100 meters relay, and she won the Silver in the 4×400 meters relay.

She would go on to win the James E. Sullivan Award as the top amateur athlete in the United States. Griffith-Joyner retired from competitive sports shortly afterwards.

Then Flo-Jo became the object of controversy. Since her performance had improved dramatically over a short period of time, and her physique changed a lot, she was accused of using performance enhancing drugs. She attributed the change in her physique to new health programs. It turns out that the International Olympic Committee’s medical commission claimed that Joyner was singled out for rigorous drug testing during the 1988 Seoul Olympics because of steroid rumors. And she passed with flying colors. There was not a trace of any performance enhancing drugs in her system.

In 1996, Flo-Jo attempted a comeback, so she could run the 400 meter race, and potentially become a record holder in that event as well, since she had already set world marks in both the 100 and 200 meter events. However, tendonitis in her right leg ended her hopes of becoming a triple world record holder.

Sadly, Flo-Jo died in her sleep on September 21, 1998 from a severe epileptic seizure. She was only 38.

Here is Flo-Jo in action: