Tag Archives: Foreigner

Remember That Song – 9/19/18

Can you name the artist and song:

Your heart has called me closer to you
I will be all that you need
Just trust in what we’re feeling


Last Song: “Urgent” by Foreigner from the album 4 (1981)

Great job sweetpurplejune and Jim (@JimVilk)!!!

But I’m not looking for a love that will last
I know what I need and I need it fast

If you’d like to get this song from Amazon, you can click on the album cover below

Top 40 Songs This Week: January 19, 1985 – Songs 10-1

Hey Everybody! Welcome back to this week’s Top 40 Countdown! If you missed the previous songs, you can go back and check out songs 40-31, 30-21 and 20-11. When I began this week, I had no idea that this would be one of the best, if not THE best countdown I’ve covered so far. Let’s see if this streak continues today. Let’s Return to the week ending January 19, 1985, and wrap up the countdown.


10. “Careless Whisper” by Wham! Featuring George Michael

We start the top 10 with one of the most iconic sax riffs of the ’80s. This is one of the few Wham! songs co-written by Andrew Ridgeley (the other member of Wham!, kids).

9. “Born in the U.S.A.” by Bruce Springsteen

One of the most patriotic songs ever. Right President Reagan. Only if you consider a song about how Vietnam veterans were mistreated, to be patriotic. Oops.

8. “We Belong” by Pat Benatar

One of my favorite Pat Benatar songs. It was the lead single off of her Tropico album and earned her a Grammy nomination for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.

7. “The Wild Boys” by Duran Duran

Awesome song. Crazy-ass video.

6. “Run to You” by Bryan Adams

Lead single from one of my favorite albums, Reckless.

5. “Easy Lover” by Philip Bailey & Phil Collins

What do you get when you combine one of the most successful musicians of the ’80s with a lead singer of Earth, Wind & Fire? Pure perfection.

4. “I Want to Know What Love Is” by Foreigner

Great ballad that would be one of Foreigner’s signature songs.

3. “You’re the Inspiration” by Chicago

Classic Chicago ballad, made memorable by the fake Madonna and fake Billy Idol in the video.

2. “All I Need” by Jack Wagner

General Hospital knew how to churn out the musicians!Landing at #2 isn’t too shabby for a soap opera actor!

1. “Like a Virgin” by Madonna

Madonna was at the top of her game here as one of the biggest ’80s icons.

 

 

 


Well that wraps up this week’s countdown. I hope you enjoyed it as much as I have. Until next time, Keep your feet on the ground, and keep reaching for the stars.

Remember That Song: 12/28/17

Can you name the artist and song:

Now who can you turn to
When it’s all black and white
And the winners are losers
You see it every night


Last Song: “Urgent” by Foreigner from the album 4 (1981)

Great job MC Chunky A (@MCChunkyA)!!!

You’re not warm or sentimental
You’re so extreme, you can be so temperamental

If you’d like to purchase this song from Amazon, click on the album cover below:

Remember That Song: 7/31/17

Can you name the artist and this song that charted in 1980:

Girl, but you’re too proud, and you won’t give in
But when I think about all I could win


Last Song: “That Was Yesterday” by Foreigner from the album Agent Provocateur (1984)

Great job Andy (@Torahguy)!!!

I had the world in my hands
But it’s not the end of my world
Just a slight change of plans

 

If you’d like to purchase this song from Amazon, click on the album cover below:

Episode 9: Foreigner

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So far, 2017 has started off much better than 2016. For me, the year began with a tweet from Lou Gramm, former lead singer of Foreigner. Therefore, we could not resist cover one of the best rock bands of the ’70s and ’80s.

In addition, our ’80s crossover event – ’80s Innovations – is discussed. We also have a new Play This, Not That, Remember That Song, and ’80s Trivia.

Now, let’s take a look back at Lou Gramm and Foreigner.



Opening

– Return to the ’80s gets Tweeted at by Lou Gramm
– New One Day At a Time show on Netflix, based on the original series

Listen to This, Not That – Quarterflash

– Instead of this:
Harden Your Heart

– Play This:
Find Another Fool

80’s Blog and Podcast Extravaganza (Episode 3) – #80sInnovations

80sinnovations
Paul

  • Personal Computing – Commodore 64
  • Break Dancing
  • Over-the-top action stars

Robert

  •  Hair Bands
  • VCR
  • Cable

– Listener email – James requests that we discuss Miami Vice innovations

Also check out the following sites/podcasts participating:

80s Reboot Overdrive (Podcast and Blog)

Killer Kitsch

RealWeegieMidget

Rediscover the 80s

Shall We Play a Game?

Remember That Song

Name the artist and song:
You play tricks on my mind, you’re everywhere, but you’re so hard to find
You’re not warm, you’re sentimental
You’re so extreme, you can be so temperamental

If you know the answer, please email us at Returnto80s@gmail.com

80s Trivia

Last Question: What colors were on the original Rubik’s cube?
Answer: Red,white, blue, green,orange, yellow

Winner: Scott Compton

New Question [From Totally 80s Trivial Pursuit]: What screen siren appeared in Stripes, Blade Runner, No Way Out and Wall Street?

Once again, if you know the answer, please email us at Returnto80s@gmail.com

Main Topic: Foreigner

Woman in Black (Robert)

In Pieces (Paul)

True Blue Love

Tooth and Nail (Robert)

Jukebox Hero (Paul)

Angel with a Dirty Face

Cold as Ice (Robert)

Heart Turns to Stone (Paul)

Just Between You and Me

Say You Will (Robert)

With Heaven On Our Side (Paul)

Ready or Not

Blue Morning Blue Day (Robert)

Long Long Way From Home (Paul)

Midnight Blue

Honorable mention – I Want to Know What Love is


We hope you enjoyed this episode. Please email us at returnto80s@gmail.com if you want to discuss Foreigner or anything ’80s.

Come find us at:
https://returntothe80s.wordpress.com/
Find Return to the ’80s on Facebook
Twitter – @returntothe80s

And also check us out on iTunes, Soundcloud, Stitcher, or anywhere else you get your podcasts from.

Top 40 Songs This Week – October 17, 1981: Songs 20-11

Welcome back to this week’s Top 40 countdown. If you missed the previous songs, you can go back and check out songs 40-31 and 30-21. At this point in time, MTV was still in its infancy, as it just debuted 2 1/2 months ago. Some artists already threw their hat in the ring, and filmed music videos. Others were not yet ready to embrace this medium. So, this is a very interesting and transitional time. Now, let’s Return to the week ending October 17, 1981, and continue the countdown.


20. “Say Goodbye to Hollywood” by Billy Joel

As far as I’m concerned, you can’t go wrong with Billy Joel. This song was originally released in 1976 on his Turnstiles album. But, it didn’t have success until it was released on Joel’s live album, Songs in the Attic.
Another fun fact: Billy Joel confirmed that he wrote the song with Ronnie Spector and The Ronettes song “Be My Baby” in mind. Because of this, Ronnie Spector recorded her own cover version of “Say Goodbye to Hollywood” in 1977 with the E Street Band, soon after Joel released his first recording of the song on Turnstiles.

19. “We’re In This Love Together” by Al Jarreau

downloadDuring this part of the decade, there were a lot of country-crossover hits. But, now we have a jazz-crossover hit! This is a song I would never have listened to back when it was released, but absolutely love it now. This song came off of Al Jarreau’s Breakin’ Away album, which was his most popular album, spending two years on the Billboard 200. it also won Jarreau the Grammy Award in 1982 Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male.

18. “I Could Never Miss You (More Than I Do)” by Lulu

This was the fourth and final US Top 40 hit for the Scottish songstress. Lulu is best known for her title track songs for the movies To Sir With Love, and The Man with the Golden Gun.

17. “Super Freak (Part 1)” by Rick James

U can’t touch this Rick James smash hit (unless you’re M.C. Hammer), which topped the pop, R&B and dance charts in the US.

16. “When She Was My Girl” by The Four Tops

This was the Mowtown legends’ return to the Top 40. It was the first song released from their new record label Casablanca Records. The song also became an international hit.

15. “Share Your Love With Me” by Kenny Rogers

This isn’t exactly one of Kenny Rogers’ most well known songs. But, it did reach number 14 on the Hot 100 and 5 in the US Country charts. It was off of his album Share Your Love, which was produced by Lionel Richie.

14. “Tryin’ to Live My Life Without You” by Bob Seger

This song was originally performed by Otis Clay in 1973. Bob Seger’s cover of this song is the most successful version of the song, reaching number five on the pop singles charts.

13. “Hold On Tight” by Electric Light Orchestra (ELO)

This was the first single released off of ELO’s 1981 album, Time, and became an international hit. I’m not sure if I would have heard of this song if it wasn’t featured in The Coffee Achievers TV commercials….

12. “I’ve Done Everything For You” BY Rick Springfield

Well, if you’re gonna follow-up “Jessie’s Girl”, this is the way to do it. Rick Springfield proved he was here to stay with this Sammy Hagar penned tune. Just like “Jessie’s Girl”, this rocker came off of Rick Springfield’s 1981 international breakout album Working Class Dog, and would reach up to #9 on the charts.

11. “Urgent” by Foreigner

I’m not sure what the U.S. presidential debate fact-checkers would say, but I believe that this is where the rage of the ’80s sax solo began. This was the first single released from Foreigner’s classic 4 album. The album was produced by “Mutt” Lange. The then-unknown Thomas Dolby played synthesizer on some tracks on the album, including this song. And the aforementioned sax solo was performed by by Motown great Junior Walker.


That wraps up today’s list of songs. So far, this has been a pretty solid week. And the best is yet to come! So come back Friday to see what the Top 10 was this week in 1981. And as usual, I would love to hear your thoughts on this countdown. See ya Friday!

Top 40 Songs This Week – October 17, 1981: Songs 30-21

Welcome back to this week’s Top 40 countdown. If you missed the previous songs, you can go back and check out songs 40-31. One thing I love about the countdowns in the early ’80s is the wide variety of music. There was still variety later on in the decade too, but nothing like this. Today, we have some rock, country, pop, R&B, and even an instrumental thrown in here. So, let’s Return to the week ending October 17, 1981, and move on with the countdown…


30. “The Voice” by The Moody Blues

At this point, I had still not heard of The Moody Blues. My introduction to them would not come until 1986 with “Your Wildest Dreams“. This song started off promising. But when Styx didn’t chime in with Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto, I was disappointed. This isn’t a bad song. I can see how it got by me, though. I appreciate it more now then I would have back then.

29. “Atlanta Lady (Something About Your Love)” by Marty Balin

Marty Balin was a founding member of Jefferson Airplane/Jefferson Starship. He left the band in 1978. Since the only songs I know by that band from that era are the ones Grace Slick sung, I was not familiar with Marty Balin. This is another middle-of-the-road song for me. Not horrible, but not that good. But, now we will be leaving my uncharted territory, and start getting to more familiar songs.

28. “Every Little Thing She Does is Magic” by The Police

I know a lot of people love Sting’s solo career. But, I really love these days when he was teamed up with Andy Summers and Stewart Copeland. This is a classic Police tune from their album Ghost in the Machine.

27. “Oh No” by The Commodores

This was The Commodores’ last hit single with Lionel Richie in the band. This is another favorite of mine. It is just as good, if not better, than some of Richie’s other ballads. This song was also featured in the 1982 movie The Last American Virgin.

26. “Queen of Hearts” by Juice Newton

This country-crossover hit was written by written by Hank DeVito, the pedal steel guitarist in Emmylou Harris’ backing group The Hot Band. Juice Newton made this a smash hit, reaching up to #2 for two weeks, being kept out of the top spot by “Endless Love” by Diana Ross and Lionel Richie.Juice Newton earned a 1982 Grammy nomination for Best Female Vocalist in the C&W category.

25. “Waiting For a Girl Like You” by Foreigner

This is another smash hit which peaked at #2 on the charts. This power ballad from Foreigner’s classic 4 album, was in the number 2 position in the week of November 28, where it was held off the number 1 spot by Olivia Newton-John’s “Physical” for nine consecutive weeks, and then by Hall & Oates’ “I Can’t Go for That (No Can Do)” for a tenth week on January 30, 1982.

24. “She’s a Bad Mama Jama (She’s Built, She’s Stacked)” by Carl Carlton

Time to get funky! This classic R&B hit earned Carl Carlton a Grammy Award nomination for Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male. If you are friends with a Bruno Mars fan, point them to this song to see what it’s all about.

23. “Here I Am (Just When I Thought I Was Over You)” by Air Supply

To prevent confusion, this song was originally released as “Here I Am (Just When I Thought I Was Over You)” so as not to be confused with the group’s No. 1 hit song “The One That You Love” which contains the lyrics: “Here I am, the one that you love.” It didn’t work with me because I still got confused.
When I was in junior high school, I was in a Catholic school. When we had dances, we had them in one of the classrooms, and moved the desks off to the sides of the room. One of the mothers would “dj” by playing tapes and albums on a stereo that somebody brought in. Whenever they wanted to play a slow song, it was always an Air Supply song. So these Air Supply songs bring me back to that time.

22. “The Theme from Hill Street Blues” by Mike Post

indexIn addition to this smash hit that earned Mike Post a Grammy for Best Instrumental Composition, you may know this legendary music producer’s other work in television shows such as Law & Order, Law & Order SVU, The A-Team, NYPD Blue, Renegade, The Rockford Files, L.A. Law, Quantum Leap, and Magnum, P.I.

21. “Just Once” by Quincy Jones Featuring James Ingram

As we drive off in tears at the end of the countdown for the day, let’s listen to the awesome, but sad, ballad by Quincy Jones and James Ingram. This song was featured in The Last American Virgin as Diane Franklin broke Gary’s and our hearts.


That wraps up today’s list of songs. I hope you are enjoying this. Let me know what you think so far. We are already halfway done. Come back tomorrow to see what other awesome songs were topping the charts this week in 1981.

Sax in the ’80s

Hi Everybody! This week Robert is taking a break from Deep Tracks. Instead, he is delving into an awesome topic – 80’s songs that feature a saxophone. Along with the synthesizer, I feel that the sax gives songs that classic ’80s signature sound. Perhaps it’s no coincidence that just about the only new song I’ve liked in recent years is “The Edge of Glory” by Lady Gaga. The late, great Big Man, Clarence Clemons (of E-Street Band fame) has a sax solo in that song.

This will be a two-part series, with 5 songs each day. Take it away, Robert


It has been a tough few weeks for fans of ‘70s and ‘80s pop culture. The recent deaths of David Bowie, Alan Rickman, and Glenn Frey have taken many of us by surprise. We have all read about the lives and careers of these great artists, so I am not going to rehash all of that information. As I have been thinking about these three, I keep coming back to Glenn Frey, both his solo work and the music he created with the Eagles. For years I have enjoyed the great songs that he created on his own or with the legendary band. I vividly remember buying the Eagles single “New Kid in Town” and listening to it over and over again, each time feeling sadder and sadder for the new kid. As I moved into high school and college I gained a huge love and respect for all of the Eagles’ music. Frey’s solo work was also outstanding. Songs like “The Heat is On” and “Smuggler’s Blues” were on dozens of mixtapes that I made- forcing my friends to listen to these great songs.

Over the past week I have listened to many of Frey’s songs and have rediscovered two of my favorites, “The One You Love” and “You Belong to the City.” I also remembered that one of the reasons I love these songs is the use of the saxophone. Naturally, this lead me to thinking about other ‘80s songs that have the prominent use of a saxophone. It took some deep trips into my memory and a little research, but I have come up with my ten favorite ‘80s hits that feature the smooth sounds of the sax; I am defining “feature” as having, at minimum, a sax solo. This is by no means meant to be a comprehensive list, just my favorites and a nod to Glenn Frey whose music got me thinking about it. So here they are – in no particular order, my favorite ten ‘80s song with a clear saxophone element being used.


“The One You Love” by Glenn Frey

I begin this list with the song and artist that is the inspiration for this list. This is my favorite solo hit by Frey and comes from his debut solo album No Fun Allowed in 1982. The song reached #15 on the AT 40 and, while that is a respectable chart position, it does not really capture the full quality of this song. The saxophones are played by two musicians; the repeating theme in the song is played by Ernie Watts and the solo sax at the end of the song is played by Jim Horn (no, this is not a pun). This is a slow paced, somber tune that depicts a moral dilemma. The woman in the song is trapped between two men and must make a choice that is going to have a profound effect on both men, “Someone’s going to cry when they’ve learned they lost you / Someone’s going to thank the stars above.” Each man speaks to a different side of the woman which makes her decision extremely difficult. One of the men has hurt her before and the one she is with now treats her well, but she is not crazy in love with him. The chorus ask the question that is perfectly captures her choice: “Are you going back to the one who loves you / Or are you going to stay with the one you love?” There is no easy answer to this difficult situation, but we do know that this song gets Frey’s solo career off to an excellent start.

“Fortress Around Your Heart” by Sting

I will confess to being a huge fan of the Police and Sting due to the songwriting. My English teacher self loves Sting’s lyrics full of symbolism, imagery, and metaphors – call me a literary geek if you want, I will fully acknowledge and accept the label. On Sting’s first two solo albums, Dream of the Blue Turtles and Nothing Like the Sun, he seems to be trying to stylistically separate himself from the Police. He has abandoned the reggae influences for a more jazz based sound, hence the prominence of the horns. The saxophone on this track is played by the incomparable Branford Marsalis. The sax is spread throughout the song and blends nicely with Sting’s bass and guitar work. This will always be my favorite Sting song because of the lyrics. He takes an unusual twist and uses war imagery to capture a man who is regretting the way he has handled the relationship with his love. He wants to protect her, but he may have taken this to an extreme and now feel remorseful, “I recognize the walls that I once made / Had to stop in my tracks for fear of walking on the mines I’ve laid.” I believe his intentions were good, he just let things get out of hand. The chorus captures both this and his regret in doing so: “And if I built this fortress around your heart / Encircled you in trenches and barbed wire / Let me build a bridge, for I cannot fill the chasm / Let me set the battlements on fire.” I have always been a huge fan of Sting’s songwriting and this song is a prime example of this. I am looking forward to seeing him at the NBA All-Star game in a few weeks.

“Careless Whisper” by Wham! featuring George Michael

I have absolutely no problem in declaring my love for Wham!’s album Make It Big. It was one of my favorites in high school and my best friends and I nearly wore the grooves off of the record. This particular song ended up as the #1 song of 1985 (“Wake Me Up Before You Go Go” was #3) and I have always been fascinated with the raw emotions of the lyrics. The gorgeous saxophone is played by Steve Gregory and truly carries this somber song. When people think of this song Gregory’s excellent sounding horn comes to mind immediately. While this song is from the Make It Big album, it is a solo effort by George Michael and it clearly played an instrumental role in him embarking on a solo career soon after it’s success. The song is one of regret. The speaker has made an enormous mistake and lost his love, “Should have known better than to cheat a friend / And waste the chance that I have been given.” Now he is realizing that he has lost a very special relationship and realizing he can never get it back, “I’m never going to dance again / These guilty feeling got no rhythm . . . So I’m never going to dance again the way I danced with you.” The chorus is agonizing and full of guilt and hopelessness – he know he has lost her forever because of something he did. I am always caught by the bridge in this song, “Maybe it’s better this way / We’ve hurt each other with the things we want to say / We could have been so good together / We could have lived this dance forever / Now who’s going to dance with me.” As an adult who married his high school sweetheart, this song has always stayed with me and serves as reminder of being true to the one who is most important in my life.

“True” by Spandau Ballet

This 1983 hit may now be best remembered for making an appearance in Sixteen Candles – remember the dance scene?

This is Spandau Ballet’s only significant hit in the U.S., putting this song on the category of one hit wonder. If you only get one hit, it might as well be a memorable one like “True” that still makes us stop, listen, and reflect on our high school days. This slow jam of a song is a perfect fit for and a staple of high school dances in the ‘80s. I have fond memories of standing up against the wall, too embarrassed to dance to the fast songs and way too scared to ask anyone to dance to this one. Most memorable are the smooth vocals by Tony Hadley, the simple and repeating guitar plucks and the sax by Steve Norman. There is not much about the lyrics that has not been said, so I offer you a challenge: play this song sometime soon and try not to sway back and forth and hit those “dunt dunt (pause) dunt dunt” sounds. You can’t resist – and neither can I.

“Urgent” by Foreigner

I love Foreigner and the album 4 that this song comes from is one of the major reasons why. There are truly no bad songs anywhere on this album. This album, released in 1981, had five AT 40 hits with “Urgent” hitting #4. This is a great rock song with great guitar work by Mick Jones and Lou Gramm’s signature vocal style. The unforgettable sax solo is played by Junior Walker while the rest of the sax is played by Mark Rivera (although the video does not suggest this). The song as about a woman who just seems to have a burning need to be with the speaker. This is never meant to be a long term relationship, rather a quick-hit whenever needed. I have always enjoyed the pace of this song, lyrics included. I love the way they phrase lines like, “You play trick on my mind / You’re everywhere but you’re so hard to find / You’re not warm, you’re sentimental / You’re so extreme, you can be so temperamental.” This is a fantastic song that played a large role in getting me into music. Years later (1986) when I started dating my future wife, I quickly discovered that we do not have the same passion for or taste in music – except for this album. “Urgent” and 4 was one of the first albums we listened to together and, when it comes on now, we both really get into it.

American Top 40 – May 28, 1977: Songs 10-1

Welcome back as we wrap up this week’s Top 40 Countdown! If you missed the previous songs, you can go back and check out songs 40-31, 30-21 and 20-11. This week has been a little different as we stretched all the way back to the ’70s. Now, let’s Return to the week ending May 28, 1977, and see what was at the top of the charts the weekend that Star Wars opened.

10. “Feels Like the First Time” by Foreigner

What an awesome way to start the Top 10! This was Foreigner’s debut single. It is a perfect Foreigner song, as it has a rockin’ guitar, soaring vocals, just about every instrument is on full display, and the harmonies are great.

9. “Lonely Boy” by Andrew Gold

This is a pretty good song that I had not heard before today. I like the piano and guitars in this song. This was Andrew Gold’s biggest U.S. hit, peaking at #7. Linda Ronstadt sings a blink-and-you-miss-it background vocal in the second verse.

8. “Lucille” by Kenny Rogers

Kenny Rogers picked a fine time to leave The First Edition. This was Kenny’s first solo hit of many in his incredible career.

7. “Couldn’t Get It Right” by The Climax Blues Band

This is a pretty good song by the British blues band. This song seems like it could have been a hit in any decade.

6. “Gonna Fly Now (Theme from “Rocky”)” by Bill Conti

Here is a Rocky theme we all know and love. It is a great song for a blockbuster film. After this weekend in 1977, this song was overshadowed by the soundtrack of a new little independent film called Star Wars.

5. “Got To Give It Up (Part 1)” by Marvin Gaye

indexThis was a huge, worldwide hit by Marvin Gaye. This is a pretty cool funk/disco tune. Unfortunately, this is the song that brought us the (song thieves) Robin Thicke and Pharrell 2013 hit, “Blurred Lines“.

4. “Dreams” by Fleetwood Mac

This is hard to believe. This song was Fleetwood Mac’s only U.S. #1 hit. This was a Stevie Nicks penned song from the legendary Rumours album.

3. “I’m Your Boogie Man / Wrap Your Arms Around Me” by K.C. and the Sunshine Band

111050114This is a fun dance song by K.C. and the Sunshine Band. This song was a #1 hit on this chart, and a #3 hit on the R&B chart.

2. “When I Need You” by Leo Sayer

This is a really nice ballad by the British singer=songwriter Leo Sayer. It had also been a #1 hit on this chart. I have no idea why he is wearing a Buffalo Sabres jersey in the video, other than he must be performing in Buffalo.


Before we see our #1 song, let’s see what was topping some of the other charts this week in 1977:

The top Country single was “Luckenbach, Texas (Back to the Basics of Love)” by Waylon Jennings

The #1 Adult Contemporary song was “Margaritaville” by Jimmy Buffett

The best Dance single was “Devil’s Gun”/”We Got Our Own Thing”/”Sure Can’t Go to the Moon” by C.J. & Company

The #1 album this week is one that you may have heard of – Rumours by Fleetwood Mac

And the topping the R&B chart is our #1 song this week:

1. “Sir Duke” by Stevie Wonder

What a way to close out the week! As much as I like a lot of Stevie’s songs in the ’80s, I prefer his ’70s work. This song is a tribute to Duke Ellington, who was an influence on Stevie Wonder, and had just died three years earlier. This song is instantly recognizable by it’s horn section that begins the track. Wonder also refers to other jazz legends Count Basie, Glenn Miller, Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald.


Well, that wraps up this week’s Top 40. I hope you enjoyed this. Let me know what you think. Even though this is an ’80s site, do you mind venturing over to a different decade, occasionally?

I don’t think I’m going to be able to see the new Star Wars movie this weekend. I still have shopping to do, and a family Christmas party to go to. So, I am going to be offline until I see the movie. Most people are good at not spoiling movies. But, all it takes is one idiot to post something that will ruin the experience for me. The next couple of weeks will be short due to the holidays. So, the next Top 40 countdown will be in the new year. So, “if you’ll not be needing me, I’ll close down for a while.”

I hope you all have a totally awesome and peaceful holiday season! Until next time, Keep your feet on the ground, and keep reaching for the stars.

Remember That Song: 12/15/15

’70s Week continues. Dy-no-miiite!!! I’m feeling groovy! Let’s do a triple shot today.
Can you name the artist and each song:

Song 1:

Oh, my child
You’ll never know
Just what you mean to me
Oh, my child
You got so much
You’re gonna take away my energy


Song 2:

‘Cause we’re living in a world of fools
Breaking us down
When they all should let us be


Song 3:

And now it’s all right. It’s OK.
And you may look the other way.
We can try to understand


Last Song: “Feels Like the First Time” by Foreigner from the album Foreigner (1977)

Great job Jim (@JimVilk)!!!

And I guess it’s just the woman in you
That brings out the man in me
I know I can’t help myself