Tag Archives: Huey Lewis and the News

Remember That Song – 8/7/18

Can you name the artist and song:

Always on the scene good looks and more possessing all of me
So when it starts to coming on
Catch me getting in the mood


Last Song: “The Power of Love” by Huey Lewis and The News from Back to the Future: Music from the Motion Picture Soundtrack (1985)

Great job Tony (@Seven_Soldiers), ekitz (@ekitz), Melanie (@melanieofoz), Creighton (@WatersCreighton), and Jtwicker (@Jtwicker2)!!!

It’s strong and it’s sudden and it’s cruel sometimes
But it might just save your life

If you’d like to get this song from Amazon, you can click on the album cover below

Top 40 Songs This Week – February 28, 1987: Songs 10-1

Welcome back to this week’s countdown! If you missed the previous songs, you can go back and check out 40-31, 30-21, and 20-11. This has been a great week of music so far, and it continues today. It was so good, that we will be coming back with another countdown next week, with a twist! We will Return to the top 40 countdown for the week of March 6-12, from the UK! I know there is a huge following here of folks from the U.K. So they will get to relive their past, and 80s fans from the U.S. may discover music that did not make it over here for one reason or another. But first thing’s first. Let’s Return to the week ending February 28, 1987, and check out the top 10 songs of this week.


10. “Ballerina Girl” by Lionel Richie

This was the end of Lionel Richie’s run in the ’80s. A sweet song to end it. Supposedly, it was written for Lionel’s daughter, Nicole.

9. “Big Time” by Peter Gabriel

Peter Gabriel had some groundbreaking videos in the late ’80s. Which means that they were on MTV every other song. Which also means that I couldn’t stand it! I was dreading listening to this again, but now I’m liking it a little more.

8. “(You Gotta) Fight For Your Right (to Party!)” by the Beastie Boys

You got my rock in your rap! You got your rap in my rock! What?! Mmmm, delicious. Two great genres that go great together.

7. “Respect Yourself” by Bruce Willis

Bruce Willis hopped on that actors-turned-singers bandwagon. And he did a very respectful job of it, in my opinion.

6. “Somewhere Out There” by Linda Ronstadt & James Ingram

At this time, I was too cool to watch cartoon movies. So, I’ve never seen An American Tail. But, I do love this song. Such a perfect duet with two incredible voices.

5. “You Got It All” by The Jets

Nice ballad from The Jets, written by Rupert Holmes (“Escape (The Piña Colada Song)”), and sung by 13-year-old Elizabeth Wolfgramm.

4. “Will You Still Love Me?” by Chicago

If Chicago is asking us if we will still love them after the departure of Peter Cetera, the answer is Yes!

3. “Keep Your Hands to Yourself” by Georgia Satellites

Between this, and Janet Jackson’s “Let’s Wait Awhile” earlier in the countdown, all we need to do is substitute Samantha Fox’s “Touch Me” with Jermaine Stewart’s “We Don’t Have to Take Our Clothes Off”, and we would have a perfect countdown for a Catholic school dance.

2. “Jacob’s Ladder” by Huey Lewis & The News

Hands down, this is my favorite Huey Lewis and the News song. “All I want from tomorrow is to get it better than today.” That’s all anybody can ask.

1. “Livin’ On a Prayer” by Bon Jovi

Bon Jovi had a huge hit with “You Give Love a Bad Name”. But, this ’80s anthem is the one that changed them forever. When you say the words “’80s music” to somebody, this is one of a handful of songs that would immediately come to mind. This is totally deserving of the #1 spot, and a great way to end the countdown.


That’s it for this week. I hope you enjoyed this countdown. Please let me know your thoughts. And as I mentioned earlier, we will be coming right back next week with the UK Top 40 from 1983. Until then, Keep your feet on the ground, and keep reaching for the stars.

Top 40 Songs This Week: August 8, 1987 – Songs 30-21

Welcome back as the countdown continues. If you missed the first 10 songs, you can go back and check them out. In the early ’80s, radio was quite diverse. Disco was still winding down, and there were a lot of singer/songwriter, rock, and pop tunes. In the late ’80s, the Top 40 countdowns were still diverse. There was a good combination of pop, rock, and R&B. And today’s list is no exception. So, let’s go back to the good ole days, and Return to the week ending August 8, 1987, and go on with the countdown.


30. “Point of No Return” by Exposé


Often imitated, but never duplicated! This pioneering female freestyle group had an incredible start, landing four top 10 hits from their debut album, Exposure. And this was one of them.

29. “When Smokey Sings” by ABC


Am I the only one that thinks this video would be awesome if it featured Jackie Gleason, Burt Reynolds, and Jerry Reed from Smokey and the Bandit?

28. “Doing It All For My Baby” by Huey Lewis & The News


Not one of my favorite Huey Lewis songs. But man, were the videos fun back then! The music doesn’t even start until over 3 1/2 minutes in!

27. “Something So Strong” by Crowded House


Much like Exposé, Crowded House got off to a strong start, turning out hits like this and “Don’t Dream It’s Over” from their debut album.

26. “Hearts On Fire” by Bryan Adams


Yes, people born post ’80s, Bryan Adams had more hits than “Summer of ’69” and “Cuts Like a Knife”. For example…this song! I can’t get enough of it.

25. “Living In a Box” by Living In a Box


Often, the question comes up, Can you name a song with the same name as its artist? This, Night Ranger, and Danger Danger are always my go-to’s. This song has that classic ’80s pop sound.

24. “Girls, Girls, Girls” by Mötley Crüe


Meh. If you want to listen to some real Crüe, go back to their first 2 albums – Too Fast For Love and Shout At the Devil.

23. “Can’t We Try” by Dan Hill and Vonda Shepard


Music whiplash! We go from a rocker to a slow duet ballad. There were a lot of great duets in the ’80s, and this is definitely one of them.

22. “I’d Still Say Yes” by Klymaxx


Another ballad I remember slow dancing to back in those high school days.

21. “Love Power” by Dionne Warwick and Jeffrey Osborne


We wrap up today with a classy song. This song was written by Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager. I love both Dionne Warwick’s and Jeffrey Osborne’s voices. And together, they sound great.


Well, we’re halfway through the countdown. What do you think so far? Do you have any favorites, or are there any surprises that you had forgotten about? Let me know.

Remember That Song: 7/6/17

Can you name the artist and song:

Deep in our soul
A quiet ember
Know it’s you against you
It’s the paradox
That drives us on


Last Song: “Walking On A Thin Line” by Huey Lewis and the News from the album Sports (1983)

Blinded by a memory
Afraid of what it might do to me
And the tears and the sweat only mock my desperation

 

If you’d like to purchase this song from Amazon, click on the album cover below:

Remember That Song: 6/2/17

Hair’s to Friday!
Can you name the artist and song:

If we take some time to think it over baby
Take some time let me know
If you really wanna go


Last Song: “Back in Time” by Huey Lewis and the News from the album Back to the Future: Music From the Motion Picture Soundtrack (1985)

Great job Rich (@RichMJr2)!!!

Don’t bet your future
On one roll of the dice
Better remember
Lightning never strikes twice

To purchase the song from Amazon, click on the album cover below:

Remember That Song: 2/29/16

Can you name the artist and song:

The sun shines
And people forget
The spray flies as the speedboat glides


Last Song: “I Want a New Drug” by Huey Lewis and the News from Sports (1983)

Great job Robert (@mishouenglish), Scooter (@sneely71), and Andy (@andytorah)!!!

One that won’t make me nervous, wonderin’ what to do.
One that makes me feel like I feel when I’m with you

Sax in the ’80s, Part II

Today, Robert wraps up his series on great songs that feature a saxophone. What are some of your favorites? Please leave a comment below. To kick off the conclusion of this week’s series, here is the legendary, late Clarence “Big Man” Clemons:

Now, take it away, Robert!


“Only the Lonely” by The Motels

As much as I love ‘80s music there were a few bands that barely registered in my collection. The Motels are one of this bands; I did have copies on a mixtape of this song, but I have never purchased an entire album by them. This song come from their most successful album, 1982’s All Four One, and reached #9 on the AT 40. The vocalist, Martha Davis, is well known to ‘80s fans, but the rest of the band toiled in relative obscurity as far as name recognition goes. The subdued sound that this band creates in this song is memorizing with the sax being played by Marty Jourard who is also the band’s keyboardist. Once again, here is a song that has great phrasing. The verses follow a simple pattern – the first two lines of each verse has a pause after two words and then continues. The third line is a longer one that has no pause. They are, in essence creating a music with words. It goes like this, “We walk (pause) the loneliest mile / We smile (pause) without any style / We kiss all together wrong no intention.” Here we have another song about the end of a relationship, this time though, I think the music first perfectly.


“Who Can it be Now?” by Men at Work

Here we have the first hit single from the Australian band that took the American music charts by storm in the early ‘80s and, honestly, sort of just faded away. This song comes from their first album Business as Usual and it hit #1 on the AT 40 in October of 1982. Men at Work feature the quirky vocals of Colin Hay who is clearly an icon of early ‘80s music as well as being in constant rotation on MTV. The saxophone is being played by Greg Ham who also doubles as the keyboard player. The sax is not limited to just a solo here, though. It establishes the song’s theme and has the sound that makes the song instantly recognizable. The song captures something we have all felt, thought, or said out loud at one time or another: “Just leave me alone!” After several pleas for solitude, Hay reveals a possible reason that he is being bothered, “Is that the man come to take me away? / Why do they follow me? / It’s not the future that I can see / It’s just my fantasy.” Is there a good reason for him to be taken away? I’m not sure, but I am sure that the success Men at Work had with their first two albums is well deserved. Their unique, fun style is something that we are missing today. I wish all of them were still around and making this intriguing music like this.


“Endless Summer Nights” by Richard Marx

Many ‘80s pundits consider 1987 as the end of the true sound of ‘80s music. Maybe. I tend to extend my definition of ‘80s through 1987 with a few good tunes from 1988 when the changes in musical styles are very apparent and the ‘80s’ sound seems to get lost. One major reason I consider 1987 as a vital part of ‘80s lore is that I graduated high school in 1987 and the rise of Richard Marx. Richard Marx’s debut album was released in the Spring of 1987 about the time I graduated; it was the first album I bought after starting college. This song, the third single released from Richard Marx, was on the charts in early 1988 and reached #2. The sax is played by David Boruff and is full of the emotional sadness that the lyrics capture. This sad, sultry ballad is about an intense summer love that is no more. The speaker is lamenting what has been lost, “Summer came and left without a warning / All at once I looked and you were gone / And now you’re looking back at me / Searching for a way that we can be like we were before.” He is just not the same without her and improving the situation does not look like a possibility. He is stuck in the memories of that summer and cannot find a way to break free of them. The chorus captures this perfectly, “I remember how you loved me / Time was all we had until the day we said goodbye / I remember every moment of the endless summer nights.” We tend to take the time we have with others for granted and when the time is over we realize that we cannot get it back – it is gone forever.


“Do You Believe in Love” by Huey Lewis and the News

I saw Huey Lewis and the News in concert in Frankfurt, Germany in November 1986. The tour was in support of their Fore! album, which I liked, but the most memorable songs were “The Heart of Rock & Rolll”, “Walking on a Thin Line”, and this early hit. This song was released in 1982 and reached #7 on the charts. The first time I heard this song I was immediately drawn in by the harmonious background vocals- I thought (and still do) they sounded so cool. The band’s saxophonist is Johnny Colla, although they typically include an entire horn sections on tour in the ‘80s called The Tower of Power horns. The song is not complex – just a lonely man looking for a woman, “I was walking down a one way street / Just a looking for someone to meet / One woman who was looking for a man.” No hidden meanings here, just a plain old love story.


“You Belong to the City” by Glenn Frey

It seems fitting to end this list with another song from the artist who inspired it. This 1985 release was written specifically for the television show Miami Vice. It helped the soundtrack album reach #1, but the song itself climbed to #2, being kept out of the top spot by Starship’s “We Built this City.” The video itself is clearly influenced by the television show; it features Frey walking through a city at night wearing a Sonny Crockett type suit. The unforgettable sax that begins the song is being played by Bill Bergman. Lyrically the song is about someone who seems to be running away from something and has come to “the city” to escape the past, “You were on the run trying to get away from the things you’ve done.” Unfortunately a sense of boredom has set in, “The moon comes up and the music calls / You’re getting tired of staring at the same four walls.” Clearly a change was desired, but in a sense of frustration, “So much has happened, but nothing has changed.” This is one of Frey’s most successful and well known solo hits a perfect way to close my favorite ‘80s hits that feature a prevalent sax sound.


I am well aware that I have most likely left some great sax work in some big songs. It is difficult to include all of them, for instance “Take Me Home Tonight” by Eddie Money. It made the first draft of my list, but ultimately, I thought these others were stronger so I left it off. Please do not be offended if I left off your favorite. There were many more sax songs in the ‘80s than I remembered at first. As I kept digging, I found more and more.

The inspiration for this list, Glenn Frey, is such an enormous musical talent that it would be useless to rehash what he has done – you already know about that. As the years continue to roll by, we will be forced to say goodbye to a lot of our favorite artist from the glorious ‘80s. There is no way to avoid it, so let us, instead, celebrate them by remembering and cherishing what they created.

Remember That Song: 12/8/15

Can you name the artist and song:

I wish you’d drop
What you’re doing
And get on the case
We could blow this existence
Right out into space


Last Song: “Do You Believe In Love” by Huey Lewis and the News from Picture This (1982)

Great job Jim (@JimVilk) and Andy (@andytorah)!!!

I was walking
Down a one-way street
Just a-looking
For someone to meet

Remember That Song: 10/22/15

Can you name the artist and song:

But I don’t know how to leave you
and I’ll never let you fall
and I don’t know how you do it


Last Song: “The Power of Love” by Huey Lewis and the News from the Back to the Future Soundtrack (1985)

Great job Jim (@JimVilk)!!!
And thanks to Andy (@andytorah) for supplying the lyrics

Tougher than diamonds, rich like cream
Stronger and harder than a bad girl’s dream

Remember That Song: 6/25/15

Can you name the artist and song:

‘Cause teacher
There are things that I don’t want to learn
And the last one I had
Made me cry


Last Song: “I Know What I Like” by Huey Lewis and the News from Fore! (1986)

I’m only hoping
That you understand
This feeling that I’m feeling
When I’m holding your hand