Tag Archives: Huey Lewis and the News

Remember That Song: 6/2/17

Hair’s to Friday!
Can you name the artist and song:

If we take some time to think it over baby
Take some time let me know
If you really wanna go


Last Song: “Back in Time” by Huey Lewis and the News from the album Back to the Future: Music From the Motion Picture Soundtrack (1985)

Great job Rich (@RichMJr2)!!!

Don’t bet your future
On one roll of the dice
Better remember
Lightning never strikes twice

To purchase the song from Amazon, click on the album cover below:

Remember That Song: 2/29/16

Can you name the artist and song:

The sun shines
And people forget
The spray flies as the speedboat glides


Last Song: “I Want a New Drug” by Huey Lewis and the News from Sports (1983)

Great job Robert (@mishouenglish), Scooter (@sneely71), and Andy (@andytorah)!!!

One that won’t make me nervous, wonderin’ what to do.
One that makes me feel like I feel when I’m with you

Sax in the ’80s, Part II

Today, Robert wraps up his series on great songs that feature a saxophone. What are some of your favorites? Please leave a comment below. To kick off the conclusion of this week’s series, here is the legendary, late Clarence “Big Man” Clemons:

Now, take it away, Robert!


“Only the Lonely” by The Motels

As much as I love ‘80s music there were a few bands that barely registered in my collection. The Motels are one of this bands; I did have copies on a mixtape of this song, but I have never purchased an entire album by them. This song come from their most successful album, 1982’s All Four One, and reached #9 on the AT 40. The vocalist, Martha Davis, is well known to ‘80s fans, but the rest of the band toiled in relative obscurity as far as name recognition goes. The subdued sound that this band creates in this song is memorizing with the sax being played by Marty Jourard who is also the band’s keyboardist. Once again, here is a song that has great phrasing. The verses follow a simple pattern – the first two lines of each verse has a pause after two words and then continues. The third line is a longer one that has no pause. They are, in essence creating a music with words. It goes like this, “We walk (pause) the loneliest mile / We smile (pause) without any style / We kiss all together wrong no intention.” Here we have another song about the end of a relationship, this time though, I think the music first perfectly.


“Who Can it be Now?” by Men at Work

Here we have the first hit single from the Australian band that took the American music charts by storm in the early ‘80s and, honestly, sort of just faded away. This song comes from their first album Business as Usual and it hit #1 on the AT 40 in October of 1982. Men at Work feature the quirky vocals of Colin Hay who is clearly an icon of early ‘80s music as well as being in constant rotation on MTV. The saxophone is being played by Greg Ham who also doubles as the keyboard player. The sax is not limited to just a solo here, though. It establishes the song’s theme and has the sound that makes the song instantly recognizable. The song captures something we have all felt, thought, or said out loud at one time or another: “Just leave me alone!” After several pleas for solitude, Hay reveals a possible reason that he is being bothered, “Is that the man come to take me away? / Why do they follow me? / It’s not the future that I can see / It’s just my fantasy.” Is there a good reason for him to be taken away? I’m not sure, but I am sure that the success Men at Work had with their first two albums is well deserved. Their unique, fun style is something that we are missing today. I wish all of them were still around and making this intriguing music like this.


“Endless Summer Nights” by Richard Marx

Many ‘80s pundits consider 1987 as the end of the true sound of ‘80s music. Maybe. I tend to extend my definition of ‘80s through 1987 with a few good tunes from 1988 when the changes in musical styles are very apparent and the ‘80s’ sound seems to get lost. One major reason I consider 1987 as a vital part of ‘80s lore is that I graduated high school in 1987 and the rise of Richard Marx. Richard Marx’s debut album was released in the Spring of 1987 about the time I graduated; it was the first album I bought after starting college. This song, the third single released from Richard Marx, was on the charts in early 1988 and reached #2. The sax is played by David Boruff and is full of the emotional sadness that the lyrics capture. This sad, sultry ballad is about an intense summer love that is no more. The speaker is lamenting what has been lost, “Summer came and left without a warning / All at once I looked and you were gone / And now you’re looking back at me / Searching for a way that we can be like we were before.” He is just not the same without her and improving the situation does not look like a possibility. He is stuck in the memories of that summer and cannot find a way to break free of them. The chorus captures this perfectly, “I remember how you loved me / Time was all we had until the day we said goodbye / I remember every moment of the endless summer nights.” We tend to take the time we have with others for granted and when the time is over we realize that we cannot get it back – it is gone forever.


“Do You Believe in Love” by Huey Lewis and the News

I saw Huey Lewis and the News in concert in Frankfurt, Germany in November 1986. The tour was in support of their Fore! album, which I liked, but the most memorable songs were “The Heart of Rock & Rolll”, “Walking on a Thin Line”, and this early hit. This song was released in 1982 and reached #7 on the charts. The first time I heard this song I was immediately drawn in by the harmonious background vocals- I thought (and still do) they sounded so cool. The band’s saxophonist is Johnny Colla, although they typically include an entire horn sections on tour in the ‘80s called The Tower of Power horns. The song is not complex – just a lonely man looking for a woman, “I was walking down a one way street / Just a looking for someone to meet / One woman who was looking for a man.” No hidden meanings here, just a plain old love story.


“You Belong to the City” by Glenn Frey

It seems fitting to end this list with another song from the artist who inspired it. This 1985 release was written specifically for the television show Miami Vice. It helped the soundtrack album reach #1, but the song itself climbed to #2, being kept out of the top spot by Starship’s “We Built this City.” The video itself is clearly influenced by the television show; it features Frey walking through a city at night wearing a Sonny Crockett type suit. The unforgettable sax that begins the song is being played by Bill Bergman. Lyrically the song is about someone who seems to be running away from something and has come to “the city” to escape the past, “You were on the run trying to get away from the things you’ve done.” Unfortunately a sense of boredom has set in, “The moon comes up and the music calls / You’re getting tired of staring at the same four walls.” Clearly a change was desired, but in a sense of frustration, “So much has happened, but nothing has changed.” This is one of Frey’s most successful and well known solo hits a perfect way to close my favorite ‘80s hits that feature a prevalent sax sound.


I am well aware that I have most likely left some great sax work in some big songs. It is difficult to include all of them, for instance “Take Me Home Tonight” by Eddie Money. It made the first draft of my list, but ultimately, I thought these others were stronger so I left it off. Please do not be offended if I left off your favorite. There were many more sax songs in the ‘80s than I remembered at first. As I kept digging, I found more and more.

The inspiration for this list, Glenn Frey, is such an enormous musical talent that it would be useless to rehash what he has done – you already know about that. As the years continue to roll by, we will be forced to say goodbye to a lot of our favorite artist from the glorious ‘80s. There is no way to avoid it, so let us, instead, celebrate them by remembering and cherishing what they created.

Remember That Song: 12/8/15

Can you name the artist and song:

I wish you’d drop
What you’re doing
And get on the case
We could blow this existence
Right out into space


Last Song: “Do You Believe In Love” by Huey Lewis and the News from Picture This (1982)

Great job Jim (@JimVilk) and Andy (@andytorah)!!!

I was walking
Down a one-way street
Just a-looking
For someone to meet

Remember That Song: 10/22/15

Can you name the artist and song:

But I don’t know how to leave you
and I’ll never let you fall
and I don’t know how you do it


Last Song: “The Power of Love” by Huey Lewis and the News from the Back to the Future Soundtrack (1985)

Great job Jim (@JimVilk)!!!
And thanks to Andy (@andytorah) for supplying the lyrics

Tougher than diamonds, rich like cream
Stronger and harder than a bad girl’s dream

Remember That Song: 6/25/15

Can you name the artist and song:

‘Cause teacher
There are things that I don’t want to learn
And the last one I had
Made me cry


Last Song: “I Know What I Like” by Huey Lewis and the News from Fore! (1986)

I’m only hoping
That you understand
This feeling that I’m feeling
When I’m holding your hand

What’s On My iPod?

Hi Everybody. I’ve been so tired lately, that I can’t concentrate enough to right a decent article. But, I still want to share with you. While sitting at my desk at work all day, I usually either listen to podcasts or music. Today I decided to play some songs on my iPod. As of this second, there are 12,782 songs on my iPod.
So, let’s have some fun. I will hit the ‘Shuffle’ button, and share the first ten songs that get played. I will not skip any, so it is possible that there will be some non-80s songs. The odds are even greater that there will be at least a few ’80s songs on here. Let’s get started. Hopefully, this will not be too embarrassing. Feel free to make fun of me if you want. I stand behind my music! Wait..let me make sure there is no Justin Bieber. Just kidding, I really didn’t need to check. There is a 100% chance that you will NOT hear any Justin Bieber here. I really hope there are songs on here that you will enjoy. And you may even discover new music. Here..We..Go!!

“Heart and Soul (Live)” – Huey Lewis & The News

This was on a Sports special edition that I downloaded from iTunes

“Crazy Train (Live)” by Ozzy Osbourne

From Ozzy’s Live at Budokan album

“Uncle Tom’s Cabin” by Warrant

In my opinion, Warrant is one of the most underrated bands of all time. This is a really good song off of the Cherry Pie album.

“Sometimes Love Just Ain’t Enough” by Patty Smyth and Don Henley

I still love this song. Can’t get enough of Patty Smyth.

“Mary, Mary” by Run DMC

That’s right, I love Run DMC! Why you buggin’?

“867-5309/Jenny” by Tommy Tutone

The odds are pretty good that there would be at least one ’80s essential on this list.

“Trial By Fire” by Kiss

One of my favorite songs from one of my favorite Kiss albums – Asylum

“Black Water” by The Doobie Brothers

What a great song to relax to!

“Love Chaser” by Europe

Here is another underrated hair band. This is a really good song you may not have heard of unless you have The Final Countdown album.

“I Will Not Go Quietly” by Don Henley

Awesome rocker by Henley, with Axl Rose on the backing vocals.

Well that was something completely different. I hope you enjoyed. And phew, nothing embarrassing! I may have to do this again sometime. Let me know what you thought of this article.
And it would be great if you guys listed out some songs that are on your iPod too.

Remember That Song – 10/24/13

Can you name the artist and song:

Last night a little dancer
came dancing to my door
Last night my little angel
came pumping on the floor


Last Song: “Jacob’s Ladder” by Huey Lewis and the News

Great job Cooly and Robert (@mishouenglish)!!

Now he’s trying to save me
When I’m doing all right
The best that I can

The song was written by Bruce Hornsby, and appeared on his 1988 album Scenes from the Southside.

Albums of the ’80s: Huey Lewis and the News – Sports

In 1978, Huey Lewis & The American Express were formed, and based out of the Bay Area in California. In January 1980, the American Express credit card company complained about the band name. So they changed it to what we now know as Huey Lewis and the News. Later that year, they released their self-titled debut studio album. What, you never heard of it? Well, not too many people have, as the album went largely unnoticed. However, their follow-up album in 1982 – Picture This – was successful, thanks to their breakout hit “Do You Believe In Love”.

In 1983 (yes, 30 years ago!), Huey Lewis and the News released their 3rd album – Sports. This album was what I would like to call a slow burn. It started out as ranking 6th on the U.S. charts. But, as each single was released (and played endlessly on MTV) the album and the band became more and more popular. They would gain worldwide fame, and the album would be certified 7x Platinum. By June 1984, the album would be a number 1 hit. Four singles from the album reached the top ten of the Billboard Hot 100.

Huey Lewis and the News followed-up the album strongly, as they had 2 popular songs from Back to the Future – “The Power of Love”, which was a number 1 hit, and “Back in Time”.

The band’s 4th album, Fore!, was not too shabby, as it sold 3x Platinum. But, their commercial success faded after that. By the ’90s, they weren’t exactly drumming out the hits. But they are still together and still tour.

Now, let’s hop in the Delorian, and go back 30 years to 1983, and experience the classic hit album, Sports.

The Heart of Rock & Roll

This song that leads off the album was the 3rd single released, and it reached #6 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.

This is a pretty good rocker. Most songs that have a rockin’ sax solo in the middle is aces in my book. Plus they name of several cities in the song. This way, they could cheaply get extra loud cheers whenever they mention the city they were touring in that night. And if they were in a city/town that was not mentioned in the song, I’m willing to bet that they added the name in for that night, and really got the crowd excited! Ugh! Not a bad song though, but it was one of the many songs of this album that was played over and over again on MTV and on the radio. Therefore, it didn’t take long to get sick of it.

Heart and Soul

This song was the first single released from the album, and was a #8 hit. And from the “You learn something new every day” department, I just found out that this song was released by 2 different groups prior to Huey Lewis and the News making a hit out of it. The first version was also the title track of a 1981 album by Exile. The second was released by The BusBoys for their 1982 album American Worker (couldn’t find a video for this).

This was the first time I had seen Huey Lewis and the News on MTV.

Bad Is Bad

This was the only song on the first side of the album that did not get released as a single. I didn’t know there was a video shot for this. I used to not like this song, but I like it more now. It is a cool combination of Blues and Doo-Wop.

I Want a New Drug

This was the second single released from the album, and reached up to number 6 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and topped the Dance Club Play chart.
There was controversy surrounding this song. When the similarities between this song and the theme song of the 1984 film Ghostbusters were heard, Huey Lewis sued Ray Parker Jr. for plagiarism, claiming that Parker had stolen the melody from “I Want a New Drug”.

They ended up settling out of court. But everything got stirred up again in 2001, when Lewis commented on the payment in an episode of VH1’s Behind the Music. So Parker sued Lewis for breaching confidentiality. Here’s a pretty cool mashup of the two songs:

Here’s the video that was shown a couple million of times on MTV:

Side 2

Walking on a Thin Line

While most of the big hits were on the first side of the album, I like the songs on the second side much more. This song is one of my favorites on the album. Great way to start Side 2.

Finally Found a Home

This song has the same tempo as “Walking on a Thin Line”, and I love it. Here is a live version:

If This Is It

This is probably my least favorite Huey Lewis song. This was the fourth single released from the album, and it was the third consecutive song to reach #6 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. In general, I’m not a fan of the band’s ballads. I much prefer their rockin’ songs.

You Crack Me Up

Ah, back to the rockin’ stuff. Another one of my favorites from the album.

Honky Tonk Blues

When this album came out, I was not really into Country or Blues, so I didn’t appreciate this song. But, by the time Grunge came around in the ’90s, and ran the music I loved out of town, I ended up getting heavily into Country. So, I love this song now.
This was originally done by the legendary Hank Williams. Here is some old school country with the Hank Williams version.

I think Huey Lewis and the News did a great job with the song. You be the judge yourself.

What do you think of the album? Are you like me, and prefer the lesser known songs from the album, or do you still like the hits?