Tag Archives: Moving Pictures

Top 40 Songs This Week – November 27, 1982: Songs 40-31

Welcome back to another week of some Top 40 music! This time, we Return all the way back to 35 years ago this week. Christmas season had just started, and I was 12 years old. I was past the age of getting kids toys. Instead, it was a time of home video games (in my case, Intellivision), and music. Instead of listening to my parents’ albums, I was beginning to get my own music. I would get cassettes for my birthday and Christmas, and I was constantly listening to the radio. So, the songs this week really bring me back. I hope you feel the same. So let’s Return to the week ending November 27, 1982, and begin this week’s Top 40 countdown.


40. “You Can’t Hurry Love” by Phil Collins

Phil Collins’ cover of The Supremes’ 1966 hit was his first solo #1 hit in the U.K. It would reach #10 in the U.S. This song came off of Collins’ second album, Hello, I Must Be Going!, and proved that he could be mega succcessful as both a solo artist, and as a member of Genesis.

39. “A Penny For Your Thoughts” by Tavares

This Cape Verdean family hail from my home state of Rhode Island. They had several hit songs throughout the ’70s. This song would be their final Top 40 hit, peaking at #33.

38. “Everybody Wants You” by Billy Squier

Even though Billy Squier is known to have fallen off the map not long after MTV was born, this rocker was in heavy rotation during the music channel’s infancy.

37. “What About Me” by Moving Pictures

This was the Australian group’s first number one single in their home country, spending 6 weeks at the top of the charts. It was so successful, that it came over to the U.S., and became a hit there too.

36. “Hand to Hold On To” by John Cougar

This was the third single released from John Cougar’s breakthrough album, American Fool. “Hurts So Good” and “Jack & Diane” are hard acts to follow. But this song isn’t too shabby, and has the same sound as it’s predecessors.

35. “On the Wings of Love” by Jeffrey Osborne

The second Rhode Island act of this countdown! All we need is John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band to complete the trifecta! This is Osborne’s signature song, which came off his self-titled debut album.

34. “You Can Do Magic” by America

This band had it’s heyday in the ’70s, with hits “A Horse With No Name”, “Ventura Highway”, and “Sister Golden Hair”. This song is also pretty damn good. It was a comeback song for the group, but it would be their last Top 40 hit.

33. “Africa” by Toto

This is one of my favorite songs of the ’80s. I could not get enough of this song when it was first released. It is still in heavy rotation on my playlist to this day.

32. “Be My Lady” by Jefferson Starship

Not a bad song as the band transitioned from Jefferson Airplane to Starship. The band jumped aboard the MTV bandwagon early, and were very successful throughout the ’80s.

31. “Down Under” by Men At Work

This Men At Work signature song, and anthem for Australia, is one of the more popular songs of the ’80s. This was a fun video during a fun decade.

 

 


That will wrap things up today. We will continue on with the countdown tomorrow. Where were you at this point in 1982? Did you have any favorite songs here?

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Remember That Song: 9/16/16

Hair’s to Friday!!!

Can you name the artist and song:

I’m frustrated and outdated
I really wanna be overrated
I’m a finder and I’m a keeper
I’m not a loser, and I ain’t no weeper


Last Song: “Never” by Moving Pictures from Footloose (1984)

Great job Robert (@mishouenglish)!!!

Oh you feel oh so trapped and confused
Start with nothing
You got nothing to lose

Here is the classic scene from Footloose featuring this song:

And here is the band performing the song:

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Return to the ’80s Movie Soundtracks: Footloose

 Our coverage of the classic 1984 movie, Footloose, continues today. Yesterday was a review of the movie itself. Today, Robert is going to cover what very well may be the heart and soul of the movie - the music. Enjoy!

Movie-wise this is my absolute favorite not very good movie. The plot is weak, the acting is passable, and the dialogue is, at times laughable. Consider when Ariel is spitting mad at Chuck Cranston. During an argument, Chuck is being petty and jealous while physically roughing Ariel up a bit. Now, Ariel has every insult and curse at her disposal; and she opts for, “You’re so stupid!” It is difficult to find a positive review by any movie critic . . . and I don’t care- I LOVE THIS MOVIE!!! One thing I have always enjoyed more than the actual film is the movie’s soundtrack. I have seen the movie countless times: several times in the movie theatre, nearly 30 times on VHS and a dozen times on Netflix (in fact, I have it on Netflix as I write this). All of these viewings do not hold a candle to the number of times I have listened to the soundtrack. I own it on vinyl, cassette, and CD – always at the ready in case someone asks about it or I just want to be washed away in nostalgic memories.

According to Billboard, the soundtrack has sold a total of 9,000,000 copies and was #1 on the album charts for weeks (April 21 – June 30, 1984). This soundtrack spawned six Top 40 songs with three of those being Top ten hits: “Footloose” #1, “Let’s Hear It for the Boy” #1, and “Almost Paradise” #7. With all of this success, this soundtrack must be loaded with great songs, so let’s take a look.

Footloose (#1)  by Kenny Loggins (opening credits, bar scene, and prom)

Loggins is easily considered the “soundtrack king” of the ‘80s, and this song is one of the big reasons why. It is not his first soundtrack hit nor will it be his last in the ‘80s, but it may be the most popular. I recently took my younger daughter to a popular local event “Daddy Daughter Date Night.” It is an annual dinner and dance for fathers and their daughters (between first and fifth grades). During the dance portion, the DJ played Footloose and all of the girls screamed and rushed to the dance floor. As much as I love this song, the reaction of all of these young girls to a song released over twenty years before they were born gave me goosebumps; this must be a sign of a true classic. The video contains clips from the film. The original video release was Ren’s big dance scene – that never made sense to me because they used a different song in the film (see track 9).

Let’s Hear it for the Boy (#1) – by Deniece Williams (Ren teaching Willard how to dance)

Despite this song being a huge hit and being used in a funny montage in the movie, it may be my least favorite. It has a memorable chorus and a smooth dance beat, but it has never really appealed to me – I have no good reason – it just doesn’t.

Almost Paradise (#7) – Almost Paradise by Mike Reno (from Loverboy) and Ann Wilson (from Heart) (prom as well as an instrumental version in the music box that Ariel gives Ren)

There is not much I can say about this song. It is one of the all time great love songs from the ‘80s. I have danced to it with my girlfriend (now wife) and it will always be one of my favorite romantic songs that I cannot, and will not, turn off before it is finished.

Holding Out for a Hero (#34) – by Bonnie Tyler (tractor chicken race)

I love Tyler’s first big hit “Total Eclipse of the Heart“, but I think this song is even better. I am shocked it only reached #34 on the Billboard charts. This song has some grit and enthusiastic drive. It has some of my favorite lyrics on the soundtrack. I have even used these lyrics in my English classes when discussing the importance of heroes to society and literature and the difficulty we have pinpointing the constantly changing definition, “Where have all the good men gone and where are all the gods? Where is the street-wise Hercules to fight the rising odds?”

Dancing in the Sheets (#17) – by Shalamar (Ariel caught by father dancing at drive-in fast food spot)

This is a good, catchy dance tune. The first thing that pops in my mind now is a friend of mine who directed Footloose: The Musical at the high school where I teach. He was forced to cut this song because of its suggestive lyrics. C’mon, that is kinda funny. The video is from American Bandstand (remember that show?).

I’m Free (Heaven Helps the Man) (#22) – by Kenny Loggins (decorating for prom)

This is Loggins’ second appearance on this soundtrack, and, while I possess the proper reverential love for the title track, I do like this song better. It should be impossible to separate a good soundtrack from the film; perhaps this becomes a reason that I really like this song. This song fits the movie perfectly, maybe even better that all of the others. Lyrically the song is about fighting for what you believe in and striving to achieve success. In the film, this song marks Ren’s success at the town council meeting and the beginning of the preparations for prom. This lyrics to this song serve an inspirational purpose and the fit perfectly for the film’s transition to the prom scene, “Looking in your eyes, I know I’m right / If there’s anything worth my love, it’s worth the fight / We only get one chance, and nothing ties our hands / You’re the one I want, listen to me / Nothing I want is out of my reach.”

Somebody’s Eyes – by Karla Bonoff (Ariel and Chuck sneaking away to the woods)

This is the only track on the original soundtrack that does not receive any primary attention in the film. It is heard in the background, playing on the radio that Ariel brings with her on a secret, and illicit, meeting with her jerk boyfriend. The song itself is an easy-to-listen to pop song with a good chorus and decent guitar solo. Bonoff’s vocals are haunting and soothing at the same time.

The Girl Gets Around – by Sammy Hagar (Ariel switching cars while driving down the highway)

This is the only true rocker on the original soundtrack. Honestly, Hagar is somewhat out of place here. Even though this appearance is before he joined Van Halen, he was already known as the Red Rocker and had a number of heavy guitar driven, popular songs. The song is great – it fits Hagar’s style and matches the scene in the film quite well. Despite this, it does not truly match the overall sound of this soundtrack. The video is from a live performance in St. Louis.

Never – by by Moving Pictures (Ren’s solo dance of frustration)

This is my personal favorite track. I love the rhythm guitar riff and I think the scene it is used in fits perfectly. I have always been a bit of a sap for the cheesy inspirational lyrics and this song has a great one, “If you don’t give your heart wings, you’ll never fly.” I do not even care that Kevin Bacon is not the one dancing in this scene- this song carries an uplifting message with a catchy beat.

The 1998 reissue of the soundtrack included four additional tracks, but I am sticking with the original release.

In the ‘80s there was such a strong connection between movies and their soundtracks. In some of those films the music played a prominent role. If you track Top 40 hits from soundtracks, you will see double digit numbers in ‘84, ‘85, and ‘86. Footloose is clearly one of the most famous and successful examples. The music on this soundtrack can be called nothing except iconic. I never tire of watching the movie or listening to this amazing soundtrack. Every list of best soundtracks is obligated to include this shining example at at near the top.

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One Hit Wonders of the ’80s: 1983 – Moving Pictures

“What About Me” by Moving Pictures

Moving Pictures was formed in Sydney, Australia in 1980. In 1982, “What About Me” was released off of their debut album, Days of Innocence. It was the band’s first number-one single in Australia spending six consecutive weeks on the top. The song’s success led the band to the U.S., where the song also became a hit. The song spent 26 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at #29 on February 12, 1983.

Moving Pictures were then signed to the Elektra distribution label in the America. Unfortunately, just after they signed, the record label collapsed.

Their second album, Matinee, was released in October 1983, which reached number 16 in Australia. They released four singles from the album, but only “Back To The Streets” was able to crack the Australian Top 40, and none charted in the U.S.
There was friction in the group, and guitarist Garry Frost left the group in 1984. This occured the same year that Footloose came out. What about me may have been Moving Pictures’ only top 40 hit in the U.S., but Footloose fans also know Moving Pictures from these scene with Ren’s “angry dance”:

The band continued to tour in Australia and gained a strong, loyal following but it wasn’t until 1987 that they released their next album, The Last Picture Show, based on their ‘Live Picture Show’ tour that took place earlier in May 1987, at the end of that year. Soon after the group disbanded.

“What About Me” was also covered by Australian Idol series one runner-up Shannon Noll. The song was released in 2004 and debuted at number-one and stayed there for four weeks.

Here is the original “What About Me” by Moving Pictures:

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