Tag Archives: MTV

Three Innovations That Made the ‘80s for Me

80sinnovations
Welcome to another ’80s crossover event. Every month, we collaborate with some other ’80s blogs and podcasts, and discuss a specific topic. This month will be a fun one – ’80s innovations. We each picked 3 items to discuss. In addition to technology, there were several other awesome innovations in the ’80s. There were many toys, movies, fashion, and food created or came to prominence in the ’80s. My three choices are here. Return to the ’80s’ own Robert Mishou wrote this article, and mine will follow next week. In addition to our picks, be sure to check out these other participating sites:
’80s Reboot Overdrive Podcast and Blog
Rediscover the ’80s
Weegiemidget
Killer Kitsch

Here are Robert’s three picks:


Cable

Charter. Time Warner. Direct TV. Today, we take for granted the number of television stations available as well as the wide variety of programming we can watch. But it wasn’t always this way. Growing up most of us had three channels to choose from – ABC, NBC, and CBS (no one really wanted to watch PBS). In the late ‘70s I would toggle back and forth through these three networks looking for something to watch on my new portable black and white TV that my parents bought me for my tenth birthday. I found a few shows I liked, but never really spent too much time watching TV (this is probably why I started listening to music so much). All of this changed when cable showed up! There were only a few new stations that came with our newly acquired cable package when we lived at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas in 1980, but I watched them constantly. By far, my favorite channel was MSG the Madison Square Garden network that showed sports from New York all of the time. I was on a hockey high having just watched the Miracle on Ice. Yes, I watched all of the U.S. hockey games live – even the victory over Russia which would be replayed later in prime time for to let all Americans bask in the glory of defeating the evil hockey giants from the U.S.S.R. At the time I could not get enough hockey and I watch every Rangers game that was on MSG.

cable

Adding to my burgeoning interest in sports, the cable company in San Antonio broadcast San Antonio Spurs games – the road games as least. Usually, the home games were blacked out so I stared at the THIS GAME IS UNAVAILABLE IN YOUR AREA screen in abject disappointment. This was a minor bump in my road to following the Iceman George Gervin in every other NBA city.
My love for cable TV came to an abrupt halt in 1981 when my U.S. Army father was rotated out of San Antonio and to Frankfurt, (West) Germany. I narrowly missed the debut of what would eventually become my most sought after station: MTV . . .

BUT . . .

the VCR

Yes, the Video Cassette Recorder saved me – it really saved me! I loved living in Germany – I was close to my grandparents who were Dutch and lived just a three hour drive from Frankfurt in a small town in Holland called Valkenburg a/d Guel. I also met my best friends LeRoyce and Marvin in Germany, and together we pined for the lack of cable and (based on what we heard and read) the amazingly awesome MTV. There was one American TV station that we had access to (American Forces Network) and it broadcast from six in the morning until midnight. It would show a sampling of programs from the three big networks, but they were always a season behind. To combat this lack of visual programming, nearly every American family overseas owned a VCR – we had to! There was so little on TV that you had to watch movies on the VCR to fill in the gaps.

vcr

We went to almost every movie that showed in the American theaters. I have fond memories of watching Ghostbusters, E.T., and Beverly Hills Cop in theaters about seven months after each premiered in the U.S. Even though we were lucky enough to have access to these theaters, it did not really solve the problem of not much to watch at home.

This is where the VCR come in. Since nearly everyone owned a VCR, we were always trading video cassettes – dubbing movie after movie – renting from American video stores – very rarely purchasing a coveted movie (they were VERY expensive in the ‘80s) – all in the attempt to stay entertained. One summer I watched Superman II every single day in June and July! Classics like Stripes, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, The Karate Kid, and 48 Hours made the rounds. If you got a hold of a new movie, you were obliged to put it in the rotation. All of your friends got to have it for a few days and then they passed it on to someone else. This is the reason why movies were dubbed all of the time. I had some very poor quality movies on video cassette that were dubbed and dubbed and dubbed – I did not care, I needed something to watch.

Wait. You say I started this VCR bit with a reference to MTV and I have made no connection to MTV at all! Ok, here it is. All of the teens who lived in Germany in the ‘80s knew about MTV. We read about it and we saw it on news reports – but we could not watch it. We had music videos on Video Jukeboxes that were in every American bowling alley. We loved this but could not watch music videos in the comfort of our own homes. Enter the VCR. Many Americans returned to the United States for the Christmas holidays. When any of these lucky people returned to Germany for the start of school, they would have with them a video cassette with hours of MTV! These tapes were lent, traded, stolen – whatever – we literally WANTED our MTV.

mtv

I dubbed the crap out of these. I had five video cassettes – six hours each – full of music videos, MTV concerts, interviews – anything that was on MTV. I watched these again and again and again and . . . These tapes were my lifeline to American music and it solidified my love of music. I loved these tapes, but it did not fully quench my desire for MTV – I still had never seen it live. In 1987 I moved back to the United States – Kearney, Nebraska, specifically, for college. During my first weekend of school (the Friday, Saturday, and Sunday before classes started) I watch MTV in the dorm lounge for about thirty-five hours! I marvelled wide eyed at what I was looking at. Cable TV had once again had a profound impact my life.

Hair Bands

“Come on feel the noise!” By far one of my favorite innovations from the ‘80s was the rise of the Hair Bands. I started the decade as a huge REO Speedwagon and Billy Joel fan and my musical love for them continued as I entered my teendom. I loved the sounds that emanated from the electric guitar and I found myself wanting more of this. I did not really feel the heavy stuff like Iron Maiden, frankly it made me a bit nervous. I wanted more guitars, but I did not want the overly savage, aggressive sound. The rise of the hair bands offered me what I was looking for: guitar driven rhythms, searing solos, and calmer lyrics. I loved the outfits, the overproduced rock sound, and the enjoy life sentiments. For a time, it did not matter who the band was – if they had big hair and guitars, I gave them a chance. Bands like Quiet Riot, Bon Jovi, Skid Row, Warrant, Winger, Poison, Danger Danger, and Whitesnake all came into heavy rotation on my record player and tape deck. I completely bought into every aspect of what these bands had to offer. I stayed with them all the way through college, always on the lookout for another new rocking band. Once the grunge movement came, I knew that it would be the end of the prominence of my teased hair heroes. It would be the end of spandex laden women (and men); the end of big haired guitarist who could lay out a blistering solo with unexpected talent and verve; the end of sleek, alluring women with way too much make up. It would also be the end of monster ballads – easily my favorite thing about the genre. I am a complete sucker for songs like Skid Row’s “I Remember You”, Winger’s “Without the Nights”, Bon Jovi’s “I’ll Be There for You”, and Warrant’s “Heaven” – I still listen to them today – I cannot forget the first time I heard Poison’s “Every Rose Has a Thorn” – I was so overcome that I had to sit down.

hair-band

Thanks to XM radio, I am able to feed my fond memories of this music any day. There is not a Friday afternoon that passes without a little Hair Nation filling my car with the heavy beats, strong bass, and impassioned guitar solos of songs like “Rock You Like a Hurricane”, “Pour Some Sugar On Me”, or “Cherry Pie.” I love my Hair Bands and I miss warm summer days driving with the windows down and my car cassette stereo blasting, “Bang, bang, what’s that sound / I gave you my love and you shot me down / Bang, bang you’re so cool / Playing the game someday you’re gonna lose!”


Thanks Robert!

Do you have any favorite innovations? Also, please check out the following blogs and podcasts:

’80s Reboot Overdrive Podcast and Blog
Rediscover the ’80s
Weegiemidget
Killer Kitsch

Tweet of the Day: 80s

This is a great one that’s been going around. Today, I got this from my friend Jackie from (@SillySlater). She is a fellow ’80s child who posts all kinds of great tweets – especially ’80s tweets. So, be sure to follow her if you want to be entertained!

cszxo89xgaatxxj

Return to the ’80s Podcast – Episode 1: Journey

It’s been 6 years in the making! Here is the arrival of the Return to the ’80s podcast! Unfortunately, this debut episode comes out 1 day after we lost music legend, Prince. This coming week, we will record an episode dedicated to Prince. In the meantime, we really hope you enjoy this episode.

Introduction to the Return to the ’80s hosts: Paul Stroessner and Robert Mishou

 Not Necessarily the ’80s News

  •  R.I.P. James Noble (March 5, 1922 – March 28, 2016)
  • MTV Rebranding
  • Guns N’ Roses Reunion


Shall We Play a Game?

  • Remember That Song

The man in the silk suit hurries by
As he catches the poor old lady’s eyes
Just for fun he says, “Get a job.”

Send your answer to Returnto80s@gmail.com with Remember That Song in the subject line

  • Trivia
    Who was the producer’s first choice to play Alex P. Keaton on Family Ties?

Again, please send your answers to Returnto80s@gmail.com with Trivia answer in the subject line

Main Topic: Journey

  •  History of the band
  • Robert’s and Paul’s picks (click on the song titles to see the videos)

Separate Ways (Frontiers) – Robert
People and Places (Departure) – Paul
The Party’s Over (Hopelessly In Love) (Captured) – Robert
Escape (Escape) – Paul
Stone in Love (Escape) – Robert
Only the Young (Vision Quest Soundtrack) – Paul
I’ll Be Alright Without You (Raised on Radio) – Robert
Rubicon (Frontiers) – Paul
Chain Reaction (Frontiers) – Robert
Suzanne (Raised on Radio) – Paul

Acknowledgements

Ken Reid from the TV Guidance Counselor podcast
Ty Ray from the Beats & Eats podcast
Kari Gormley from The Running Lifestyle Show
Tina Muir from Runners Connect Run to the Top podcast as well as TinaMuir.com
Mario and Sean from 2 Friends Talking


Let us know if you have any feedback, questions, or if you would like to send us any ’80s experiences. Also, what are your favorite Journey songs? Do you have any Journey related story you would like us to read? You can email us at Returnto80s@gmail.com

Daily Trivia: 1/4/13

Question: In 1988, who hosted the debut episode of Yo! MTV Raps?


Last Question: What Madonna hit single asked the burning question: “Quien es esa nina”?

Answer: “Who’s That Girl?”

Great job Jim and Christa (@buttercup081474)!!

Quien es esa nina, who’s that girl

Daily Trivia – 6/1/11

Question: Who was the master of the “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles”?


Last Question: What MTV show devoted to heavy metal music featured Adam Curry as host in 1988?

Answer: Headbangers Ball

MTV had a monthly show called Heavy Metal Mania, which was hosted by Twisted Sister’s Dee Snider. It showed heavy metal videos, as opposed to the pop/mainstream rock videos that normally aired at the time. It was replaced by Headbangers Ball, which added interviews with the bands in addition to the videos. The new show was originally hosted by Kevin Seal, until VJ Adam Curry took over. Eventually, Riki Rachtman hosted the show, and became the face of Headbangers Ball.

Headbangers Ball was one of the most popular music shows ever to air on MTV, on the air for nearly 8 years, and for a time, it was one of the network’s flagship shows. Then in 1995, MTV abruptly cancelled the show. This was probably due to the “grunge” movement, and the fact that MTV was starting to play less music.

However, MTV2 started the series back up in 2003. It is kind of erratic now. But, they do have a page on the MTV site where you can see episodes, and clips of the show.

Here is a 1987 episode with original host, Kevin Seal, interviewing Faster Pussycat:

And here is Adam Curry in 1988, interviewing Lizzy Borden. It looks like either of them could be in a Hair Band:

And here is Riki Rachtman with Dave Mustaine of Megadeth: