Tag Archives: Musical Youth

Top 40 Songs This Week (UK Edition) – March 6, 1983: Songs 10-1

Well, here we are. The Top 10 songs in the U.K. this week in 1983. If you missed the previous songs, you can go back and check out songs 40-31, 30-21 and 20-11. There will be some very familiar songs on here for us in the U.S. However, there may still be some pleasant surprises. You can click on the song title to get to the song on YouTube, and you can click on the album cover to get the song from Amazon. Now, let’s Return to the week of March 6, 1983, and wrap up the countdown.


10. “Never Gonna Give You Up” by Musical Youth

While this British Jamaican reggae band had only 1 hit in the U.S. (“Pass the Dutchie”), they had several hits in the U.K. between 1982 and 1984. This was their second biggest hit, peaking at #6 on this U.K. chart.

 

9. “Love On Your Side” by Thompson Twins

Unlike Musical Youth, the Thompson Twins had several big hits in the U.S. But, this was not one of them. It did come close, peaking at #45. However, this was a top 10 hit in several other countries, including here in the U.K. where it peaked right here at #9.

 

8. “Tomorrow’s (Just Another Day)” by Madness

Here is another group that did not make it big in the U.S., with only two Top 40 hits. In the U.K., Madness was huge! And so was the group Madness. (my Brit friends get it) I wish this song made it over here in the U.S. I love it! “Our House” can really get stuck in your head, and this could have done the same.

 

7. “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye” by Bananarama

We should all know this song, at least from the original version by Steam. And any sports fan knows this song when their team is about to beat their opponent at home. This is a girl band version of it. I love everything Bananarama does. This was yet another song that did not hit big in the U.S., peaking at #101. But, it was a top 10 hit here, peaking at #5. This was the fifth single released from Bananarama’s debut album, Deep Sea Skiving.

 

6. “Too Shy” by Kajagoogoo

We all know this one, as it was a worldwide smash hit. It reached #1 in many countries, including the U.K. for 2 weeks. Not bad for a debut single from a debut album.

 

5. “Africa” by Toto

Another worldwide smash hit we all know. This is one of my favorites of the ’80s, and I still love it.

 

 

4. “Rock the Boat” by Forrest

Forrest is not known in the States. But we all know this song from the 1974 original by The Hues Corporation. Forrest does a great job with this. I wish it would have made it in the U.S. so I could hear it more often on 80s stations and shows.

 

3. “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)” by the Eurythmics

OK, no more surprises as we go down the home stretch. This was the Eurythmics breakthrough song all over the world.

 

 

2. “Billie Jean” by Michael Jackson

Maybe it’s possible that some of you may know this song. It was only a top 10 hit in every country in the world that has music charts, and was #1 in almost all of them. Not only was this a worldwide smash in 1983, but it became a huge hit all over the world once again when Jackson died in 2009. It wasn’t reaching the top spot again in most places. But, it was a top 10 hit just about everywhere.

 

1. “Total Eclipse of the Heart” by Bonnie Tyler

And here we are at the #1 spot! This song was written by Jim Steinman, who is best known for being Meat Loaf’s producer. This was Bonnie Tyler’s biggest hit, topping the charts in several countries. I love this song, and most Steinman produced songs.

 


This was not planned, but it is definitely fitting that “Total Eclipse of the Heart” is the #1 song. I got the idea of doing the Top 40 this week from the U.K., from a conversation I had with my best friend, who happens to be from Wales, which is where Bonnie Tyler is from. Bestie and I were talking about music. I had already known that there are a lot of songs that were huge in the U.K, but never made it here. But, this got brought to the forefront of my mind from our conversation, as I did not know some bands Bestie brought up. And there were singers I heard of, but didn’t know they were in a band. So, I thought it would be great to discover great new music.

I hope you all thought this was a good idea. Please let me know if you’d like to see more of these. I’ll be back with a new countdown in the near future. Maybe it will be from the U.S. or from the U.K.

One Hit Wonders of the ’80s: 1983 – Musical Youth

“Pass the Dutchie” by Musical Youth

“Pass the Dutchie” was a cover version of the song “Pass the Kouchie”, by The Mighty Diamonds, meaning a marijuana pipe. But, because all the members of Musical Youth were between 11 and 16 years old at the time, the group’s manager suggested a lyric change, replacing “Kouchie” with “Dutchie.” It didn’t hurt that the name change would also help it get airplay on radio and on MTV. The song was released in 1982, and peaked at #10 on February 26, 1983.

Musical Youth was a British reggae band, consisting of two sets of brothers – Kelvin and Michael Grant, plus Junior and Patrick Waite – along with lead singer Dennis Seaton. “Pass the Dutchie” helped earn the band a Grammy Award nomination for Best New Artist at the Grammy Awards of 1984 (which was won by Culture Club).

The group went on with some more successful songs in the U.K., however they never had hit again in the U.S. Musical Youth split up in 1985 when Seaton left the band. In 1993, there were plans for them to reunite. However, Patrick Waite, who had gone on to a career of juvenile crime, died in Birmingham of a hereditary heart condition (at the age of 24), whilst awaiting a court appearance on drug charges. In 2001, Musical Youth reformed. They were set to perform on the ‘Here & Now’ tour, which was to feature performances by other musicians from the 1980s. However, due to the attacks on September 11, the tour was cancelled. However, by 2003 Musical Youth were back, appearing in a 1980s nostalgia tour. As of 2005, the group has been reduced to a duo of Michael Grant and Dennis Seaton. They do have a web site.

Here is their hit song, “Pass the Dutchie”: