Tag Archives: Paul McCartney

Top 40 Songs This Week – November 27, 1982: Songs 10-1


Welcome back to this week’s Top 40 Countdown!!! If you missed the previous songs, you can go ahead and check out songs 40-31, 30-21 and 20-11. We are down to our top 10 songs. We have some true classic songs coming up, so let’s get to it. Let’s Return to the week ending November 27, 1982, and wrap up this week’s countdown.


10. “Muscles” by Diana Ross

This song earned Diana Ross her twelfth Grammy Award nomination for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance. Oh BTW, this was written and produced by someone you may or may not heard of – Michael Jackson.

 

9. “The Girl is Mine” by Michael Jackson and Paul McCartney

Speaking of Michael Jackson, this was the first single released from his up and coming album, Thriller. At least he got the worst song out of the way! It wouldn’t be so bad if it wasn’t for all that yapping at the end.

 

8. “Steppin’ Out” by Joe Jackson

Love this song by Joe Jackson! It peaked at #4, and was Jackson’s highest charting hit in the U.S. This song received a Grammy nomination for Record of the Year in 1983 but lost to “Rosanna” by Toto, which is fine by me.

 

7. “Maneater” by Daryl Hall and John Oates

This song, from Hall & Oates’ eleventh studio album, H2O, was a smash hit, hitting #1 and staying there for four straight weeks. This was a staple on MTV.

 

 

6. “Mickey” by Toni Basil

This iconic ’80s tune was Toni Basil’s only hit. But, boy was it ever a hit, reaching the top of the charts. The legendary Cheerleader video is considered the very first choreographed dance video.

 

5. “Heartlight” by Neil Diamond

Unfortunately, I am all too familiar with this song. My mom is the biggest Neil Diamond fan, so this was my life. I do like his early stuff a lot. But, I didn’t care much for his easy listening music. This song was written by Diamond, Carole Bayer Sager and her then-husband Burt Bacharach. They were inspired by the blockbuster movie E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, which Diamond, Bayer Sager and Bacharach had all seen together.

 

4. “Up Where We Belong” by Joe Cocker and Jennifer Warnes

This classic duet is from the film, An Officer and a Gentleman (which I have yet to see). The movie’s producer, Don Simpson, demanded “Up Where We Belong” be cut from An Officer and a Gentleman, saying, “The song is no good. It isn’t a hit.” (Sounds like a Trump tweet. Oh shit, here come the comments and emails!). It’s a good thing Simpson was a movie producer, and not a music producer. The song was a #1 hit in the US for three weeks, won the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song and the Academy Award for Best Original Song. It also won the BAFTA Film Awards for Best Original Song in 1984. Cocker and Warnes also won the Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal in 1983.

3. “Heart Attack” by Olivia Newton-John

This is one of those new songs that was placed on a Greatest Hits album. And this song definitely belongs there! I love this ONJ song! It was the first single released off of Olivia’s Greatest Hits Vol. 2, and was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.

 

2. “Gloria” by Laura Branigan

I have always loved Laura Branigan’s voice, and I had a huge crush on her. I was devastated when she died in 2004 from a brain aneurysm. This was Branigan’s signature song. It peaked right here at #2, and remained her for three weeks.

 

1. “Truly” by Lionel Richie

“Hello” seems to get all the love out of Lionel Richie’s ballads. But, this one is my favorite. This was also Richie’s debut solo single. It was the first single released off of his self-titled debut album. The song won a Grammy Award for Richie in the category Best Male Pop Vocal Performance. Not a shabby start for a solo career.


That wraps up this week’s countdown. I hope you enjoyed it. Did you have any favorite songs this week? Are there any that you got sick of hearing? I’d love to hear from you. Until next time, Keep your feet on the ground and keep reaching for the stars.

Top 40 Songs This Week – November 10, 1984: Songs 20-11

Welcome back as we continue the countdown. If you missed the previous songs, you can go back and check out songs 40-31 and 30-21. In my opinion, this week’s songs just keep getting better and better. Sometimes, there is a little lull, where there are songs that are just meh. But every day has been solid so far, and it will continue. So, lets Return to the week ending November 10, 1984, and continue the countdown.


20. “The War Song” by Culture Club

This song does not get as much attention in the U.S. as much as a lot of Culture Clubs hits. I like this. I don’t know if it’s because of the quality of the song, or because it does not get played to death on radio. This was the lead single from the band’s third album Waking Up with the House on Fire, and peak at #17 in the U.S. It cracked the top 10 in several other countries.

19. “No More Lonely Nights” by Paul McCartney

This is one of my favorite McCartney tunes that I still love to this day. This was from the soundtrack of Give My Regards to Broad Street. I still haven’t seen that movie yet.

18. “What About Me?” by Kenny Rogers, Kim Carnes & James Ingram

I have no idea how this song got by me. I love it! And I love all three singers. What a great combination. Then add in the fact that this song was written by David Foster and Richard Marx, and this is pure gold.

17. “Lucky Star” by Madonna

This was the beginning of Madonna becoming an ’80s icon. She would be cemented in with that status with her next album, Like a Virgin. But, the songs from her self-titled debut album, including this song, laid the groundwork. This was Madonna’s fourth single released from that album, and her first Top 5 hit, peaking at #4.

16. “Some Guys Have All the Luck” by Rod Stewart

“Some Guys Have All the Luck” was written by Jeff Fortgang, and originally performed by The Persuaders in 1973, and became a Top 40 hit. Rod Stewart’s version here was more successful, peaking at #10.
Jeff Fortgang was only in the music industry for three years. He went on to become a doctor in Psychology, and still practices in the Boston area today.

15. “I’m So Excited” by The Pointer Sisters

I always get excited when I get to play some Pointer Sisters! This song was originally released in 1982, from their album So Excited! and was a Top 40 hit, peaking at #30. It was re-released, after being slightly remixed, on their 1984 album, Break Out, and hit the charts once again, peaking at #9 this time.

14. “On the Dark Side” by Eddie & The Cruisers / John Cafferty & The Beaver Brown Band

indexRhode Island in the house!! John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band (who are from my home state of Rhode Island) performed this song for the Eddie and the Cruisers soundtrack. This is a fun Springsteenesque rocker. They have a lot of other great songs, but this is their signature song.

13. “Penny Lover” by Lionel Richie

This was the fifth and final single released from Lionel Richie’s classic, Grammy winning, Can’t Slow Down album. As with all the other singles taken from Can’t Slow Down (“All Night Long (All Night)”, “Running with the Night”, “Hello” and “Stuck on You”), “Penny Lover” was a top ten hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, spending two weeks at #8 in December 1984.

12. “All Through the Night” by Cyndi Lauper

I’m starting to see a pattern this week. This is yet another favorite song of mine by an artist. This was Cyndi’s fourth Top 5 hit in the U.S. It was off her classic She’s So Unusual album. It was originally written and performed by Jules Shear in 1983. In an article in the Chicago Tribune, Jules Shear said, “[it’s] like a big bonus really. Cyndi Lauper does a song (‘All Through the Night’) that’s on a solo record of mine. I just thought, ‘No one’s really going to hear this.’ Then she does it, and it becomes a Top 5 song.”

11. “Strut” by Sheena Easton

Sheena Easton was very popular in the early-to-mid ’80s, and this song was no exception to that success. This would be a Top 10 hit, peaking at #7.


That wraps up today’s list of songs. This week is moving right along! We will wrap up the countdown tomorrow. As the numbers get smaller, the hits get bigger.

Top 40 Songs This Week – September 25, 1982: Songs 20-11

Hi Everybody! Welcome back to this week’s Top 40 Countdown. Today, we will cover songs 20-11. If you missed the previous songs, you can go back and check out songs 40-31 and 30-21.
Just like the previous songs, this list has a mixed bag of styles. There is rock, country, pop, and R&B. This was a very interesting time. The ’70s were disappearing, but we have not really gotten to the classic ’80s sound yet. Looking over this list, everybody here had gotten their start in at least the ’70s or earlier. So let’s get to it, and Return to the week ending September 25, 1982, and continue the countdown.


20. “Do You Wanna Touch Me (Oh Yeah) by Joan Jett and the Blackhearts

I love when the list starts with a great rock song! I used to love this song – until 5 minutes ago when I found out that this is actually a Gary Glitter song. Now this song takes on a whole new meaning. If you aren’t aware of Gary Glitter’s history, I don’t want to get into details here, but you can look him up. But. I’ll still listen to Joan Jett’s version, and rock out to it.

19. “Hold On” by Santana

This is a very good Santana song, which features Alex Ligertwood on vocals. Santana is still around today. Just this year the album Santana IV was released and reunited the ’70s classic lineup of Carlos Santana, Gregg Rolie, Neal Schon, Mike Carabello and Michael Shrieve. This was the first time in 45 years they recorded together.
I know that most of us say that music sucks these days. But, I feel that it’s just Top 40 music that sucks. A lot of our bands are still releasing new work, but we never hear about it through normal channels. You just need to know where to look. As I am writing this, I’m thinking that I can help keep us informed.

18. “Let Me Tickle Your Fancy” by Jermaine Jackson

This is the title track of Jermaine Jackson’s final album for for Motown Records.
He married Berry Gordy’s daugther, Hazel, just as he started his solo career, while still playing with the Jackson 5. When The Jackson 5 left Motown for CBS records, Jermaine broke with the group and stayed loyal to Motown. After Jermaine’s 9th studio album here, he left Motown for Arista Records.

17. “Only Time Will Tell” by Asia

I really enjoy all of supergroup, Asia’s songs. The band consists of John Wetton (former bassist/vocalist of bands including King Crimson, Family, Roxy Music, Uriah Heep, UK and Wishbone Ash), Steve Howe (guitarist of Yes), Geoff Downes (keyboardist of Yes and The Buggles) and drummer Carl Palmer (of Emerson, Lake & Palmer, The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, and Atomic Rooster). This song, “Only Time Will Tell”, is my favorite by them.

16. “Think I’m In Love” by Eddie Money

Gotta love Eddie Money! This song is classic. It was just after this that Money’s career was starting to fall apart. I’m sure his drug use didn’t help. But, he did have a huge comeback a few years later with the album Can’t Hold Back, which featured “Take Me Home Tonight” and “I Wanna Go Back.” As far as I know, his most recent work was in this Geico commercial:

15. “I Keep Forgettin’ (Every Time You’re Near) by Michael McDonald

This song was off of If That’s What It Takes, Michael McDonald’s first solo album away from The Doobie Brothers. I think that in every single countdown I’ve covered, Michael McDonald has been involved in at least one song that week in one way or another, whether it’s singing lead, backup, part of a duet, or even written. I was not a fan at all. Now I’m loving everything he has done. I think my friend Jim performed some sort of jedi mind trick on me. Hey, whatever works, right? I like this song a lot now, where in the past, I may have skipped right over it. Now, somebody has to get me to like Bruce Hornsby, and one other band which will be featured in the top 10 this week.

14. “Blue Eyes” by Elton John

I know this may be blasphemous on this site, but I much prefer Elton John’s music in the ’70s than I did in the ’80s. There are some ’80s songs by him I love. But, overall there is nothing like his earlier music. This is one of those songs I don’t love. I do like it a lot if I’m in the mood for it. Otherwise, this is kind of boring for me.

13. “Love Will Turn You Around” by Kenny Rogers

Earlier, we heard my favorite Asia song. Now we get to hear my favorite Kenny Rogers tune! This was also the theme song for the movie Six Pack, in which Kenny Rogers starred. I watched it constantly when it came on HBO. I haven’t seen that movie in years. I really need to revisit it though. In addition to Rogers, the movie stars some other actors you may have heard of: Diane Lane, Erin Gray, and Anthony Michael Hall.

12. “You Can Do Magic” by America

This was a small comeback for the folk rock duo, America. This is a pretty good song. It does have that late ’70s/early ’80s sound to it.

11. “Take It Away” by Paul McCartney

Not the greatest song in the world. But, it should be noted that this song features Ringo on drums, and produced by George Martin.


Well, that wraps up today’s list. We’ll be back to finish up the Top 10 songs on Friday.

Remember That Song: 3/11/16

Hair’s to Friday!!!

Can you name the artist and song:

I been doing things your way too long, but baby that’s over (baby that’s over)
It won’t be easy, but I gotta be strong
And if I wanna cry I don’t need your shoulder


Last Song: “”Say Say Say” by Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson from McCartney’s album Pipes of Peace (1983)

Great job Robert (@mishouenglish)!!!

All alone,
I sit home by the phone
Waiting for you, baby
Through the years
How can you stand to hear
My pleading for you dear?

Remember That Song: 2/18/16

Can you name the artist and song and complete the lyrics:

And then you came around
Tried to tie me down
I was such a clown
You had to have it your way
Or __ ___ __ ___


Last Song: “No More Lonely Nights” by Paul McCartney from Give My Regards to Broad Street (1984)

Great job Andy (@andytorah)!!!

I can wait another day until I call you
You’ve only got my heart on a string
And everything a’flutter

Remember That Song: 6/19/15

Hair’s to Friday!!!
Can you name the artist and song:

I’ve been out on the front line
Where you’ll go down if you waste time
They’ll walk all over you


Last Song: “My Brave Face” by Paul McCartney (who turned 73 yesterday) from Flowers in the Dirt (1989)

I’ve Been Living In Style
Unaccustomed As I Am To The Luxury Life.
I’ve Been Hitting The Town And It Didn’t Hit Back

Remember That Song – 6/20/14

Hair’s to Friday!! \m/
Can you name the artist and song:

Still we kept love hanging on
I guess it’s meant to be
That your heart still belongs to me


Last Song: “Spies Like Us” by Paul McCartney (1985)

Hey, Hey, what do you say?
Someone took your plans away
So, what’s all the fuzz

Remember That Song: 7/23/12

Can you name the artist and song:

She’s got eyes of the bluest skies
As if they thought of rain
I hate to look into those eyes
And see an ounce of pain


Last Song: “No More Lonely Nights” by Paul McCartney:

We’ve Only Got Each Other To Blame
It’s All The Same To Me Love
‘Cause I Know What I Feel To Be Right

Daily Trivia – 3/19/12

Question: Who scrawled the best-selling cartoon collection Night of the Crash-Test Dummies?


Last Question: What did Paul McCartney title his album of oldies released exclusively in the Soviet Union in 1988?

Answer: Back in the U.S.S.R.

Back in the U.S.S.R. (Снова в СССР) was taken from The Beatles’ song of the same name from 1968’s White Album.

In July 1987, McCartney decided to get back to his roots by singing some of his favorite hits from the 1950s and over the course of two days (July 20-21), with three session musicians, he recorded twenty-two songs. Of those songs, 11 were chosen for the albums initial release in the Soviet Union on October 31, 1988. In December, the album was re-released in December with 2 additional songs – “I’m Gonna Be a Wheel Someday” and “Summertime”.

McCartney intended Back in the U.S.S.R. as a present for Soviet fans who were generally unable to obtain his legitimate recordings, often having to make do with copies; they would, for a change, have an album that people in other countries would be unable to obtain. Accordingly, McCartney never intended the album to be sold outside the USSR, and mirroring the situation as it had been within the Soviet Union, it was a popular import or bootleg album in other countries. Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, Back in the U.S.S.R. was given a worldwide release in 1991. This latest release added one more song – “I’m in Love Again” – making it a total of 14 songs.

1. “Kansas City”
2. “Twenty Flight Rock”
3. “Lawdy, Miss Clawdy”
4. “I’m in Love Again” (Bonus track on 1991 international release)
5. “Bring It On Home to Me”
6. “Lucille”
7. “Don’t Get Around Much Anymore”
8. “I’m Gonna Be a Wheel Someday”
9. “That’s All Right Mama”
10. “Summertime”
11. “Ain’t That a Shame”
12. “Crackin’ Up”
13. “Just Because”
14. “Midnight Special”