Tag Archives: Phil Collins

Top 40 This Week – Week Ending November 5, 1988: Songs 10-1

Welcome back, as we wrap up this week’s Top 40 Countdown! This brought back a lot of fond memories for me. And I do love how there was quite a few different genres represented throughout this whole countdown. So, let’s Return to the week ending November 5, 1988, and see what were the most popular songs in the country


10. “What’s On Your Mind (Pure Energy)” by Information Society

Awesome song that has that eary-mid ’80s sound. And yes that’s Leonard Nimoy’s voice as Mr. Spock from the Star Trek episode “Errand of Mercy”, which was the first time we saw the Klingons in the Star Trek universe.

 

9. “Red Red Wine” by UB40

Wow, my two least favorite ’80s songs are both on the same countdown! First there was “Don’t Worry, Be Happy”. And now there’s this Neil Diamond cover.

 

 

8. “Desire” by U2

Awesome rocker, which was U2’s first single off their Rattle and Hum album. The song won the Grammy Award for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.

 

7. “Never Tear Us Apart” by INXS

If you noticed that the last three bands in this countdown have an abbreviation/acronym as a band name, welcome to my brain.

 

 

6. “One Moment In Time” by Whitney Houston

It is in the middle of Fall, and this 1988 Olympic theme song is still going strong.

 

 

 

5. “Bad Medicine” by Bon Jovi

After Slippery When Wet launched Bon Jovi in the stratosphere, they did not let up, as they followed up with the incredible New Jersey album, with “Bad Medicine” as the lead single.

 

4. “The Loco-Motion” by Kylie Minoque

Kylie Minogue was the third act to make this song a top 5 hit, starting with LIttle Eva in 1962 and Grand Funk Railroad in 1974. This song was a locomotion for Minogue, as it started as a hit in her home country of Australia. Then it made it’s way to Europe and Asia, then came to the U.S. and Canada.

 

3. “Groovy Kind of Love” by Phil Collins

We have another cover here, as Phil Collins recorded this Mindbenders 1965/66 hit for the Buster movie soundtrack. Between this song, and “Two Hearts”, you would think the movie was going to be a blockbuster. However, I still haven’t seen it, and I don’t know anybody who ever has.

 

2. “Wild, Wild West” by The Escape Club

This song would go on to be a number one hit next week. The Escape Club the only British artist to have a No. 1 hit in the United States while never charting in the UK.

 

1. “Kokomo” by The Beach Boys

I think we can track the division in the country back to this song. I personally think it’s a fun song, although I did get very sick of it. But, a lot of people had this extreme hatred of this song. And seeing John Stamos on drums really sent them over the edge! This song would be their last hit on the Hot 100.


Well that wraps up the Top 40 this week. I hope you enjoyed it! The next time, we will hop back across the pond to the U.K. In the meantime, Keep your feet on the ground, and keep reaching for the stars.

Top 40 Songs This Week – April 5, 1986: Songs 40-31

Welcome to a new week of Top 40 music! This week, we are back to the U.S. charts. This week, we are hopping in the Delorian, and heading to 1986. At this time in 1986, I was beginning to head towards the end of my Sophomore year of high school. Academically, this was a horrible time for me. But, there was great music, TV, and movies to help get me by.
As usual, if you want to listen to the song/watch the video, you can click on the song title. If you want to purchase or listen to the song on Amazon, you can click on the album cover. Now, let’s Return to the week ending April 5, 1986, and start the countdown!


40. “Greatest Love At All” by Whitney Houston

This cover of George Benson’s 1977 hit enters the Top 40 this week. This would be one of many iconic Whitney songs.

 

 

39. “I Can’t Wait” by Nu Shooz

Time to hit the dance floor!

 

 

 

38. “Something About You” by Level 42

Level 42 had about 42 top 40 hits in the U.K. OK, I may be exaggerating a bit. They actually had 20, but 42 would have been cooler. However, in the U.S., they only had 2 hits in the U.S., with this being the first. Maybe we’ll catch more Level 42 songs when we head back to the U.K.

 

37. “I Do What I Do… (Theme From “9-1/2 Weeks”)” by John Taylor & Jonathan Elias

This song, from the soundtrack of 9 1/2 Weeks, which starred Kim Basinger and Mickey Rourke, was John Taylor’s first solo singing performance during Duran Duran’s hiatus.

 

36. “For America” by Jackson Browne

I had never heard this song. It is a pretty good rocker. And it could be just as appropriate today as it was 32 years ago.

 

 

35. “If You Leave” by Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark

Iconic ’80s tune from an iconic ’80s movie – Pretty in Pink.

 

 

 

34. “Saturday Love” by Cherrelle & Alexander O’Neal

Here is another music discovery for me. I’m loving this R&B hit!

 

 

33. “Bad Boy” by Miami Sound Machine featuring Gloria Estefan

This was Miami Sound Machine and Gloria Estefan’s second English language hit, after “Conga”. This was the beginning of a long string of hits for Gloria Estefan.

 

 

32. “Live is Life” by Opus

Totally forgot about this one, from the Austrian group, Opus! na na na-na-na
The band name makes me miss the comic strip, “Bloom County”

31. “Take Me Home” by Phil Collins

Is it me, or does it seem like every released Phil Collins tune – either solo, or with Genesis – was iconic?

 

 

 


Well that wraps up today’s list of songs. Not too shabby! Come back tomorrow as we continue the countdown!

Remember That Song: 1/29/18

Can you name the artist and song:

You turn me out, you turn me on
You turned me loose then you turned me wrong


Last Song: “One More Night” by Phil Collins from the album No Jacket Required (1985)

Great job Jim (@JimVilk)!!!

I’ve been sitting here so long
Wasting time, just staring at the phone
And I was wondering should I call you
Then I thought maybe you’re not alone

If you’d like to purchase this song from Amazon, click on the album cover below:

Top 40 Songs This Week: January 19, 1985 – Songs 10-1

Hey Everybody! Welcome back to this week’s Top 40 Countdown! If you missed the previous songs, you can go back and check out songs 40-31, 30-21 and 20-11. When I began this week, I had no idea that this would be one of the best, if not THE best countdown I’ve covered so far. Let’s see if this streak continues today. Let’s Return to the week ending January 19, 1985, and wrap up the countdown.


10. “Careless Whisper” by Wham! Featuring George Michael

We start the top 10 with one of the most iconic sax riffs of the ’80s. This is one of the few Wham! songs co-written by Andrew Ridgeley (the other member of Wham!, kids).

9. “Born in the U.S.A.” by Bruce Springsteen

One of the most patriotic songs ever. Right President Reagan. Only if you consider a song about how Vietnam veterans were mistreated, to be patriotic. Oops.

8. “We Belong” by Pat Benatar

One of my favorite Pat Benatar songs. It was the lead single off of her Tropico album and earned her a Grammy nomination for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.

7. “The Wild Boys” by Duran Duran

Awesome song. Crazy-ass video.

6. “Run to You” by Bryan Adams

Lead single from one of my favorite albums, Reckless.

5. “Easy Lover” by Philip Bailey & Phil Collins

What do you get when you combine one of the most successful musicians of the ’80s with a lead singer of Earth, Wind & Fire? Pure perfection.

4. “I Want to Know What Love Is” by Foreigner

Great ballad that would be one of Foreigner’s signature songs.

3. “You’re the Inspiration” by Chicago

Classic Chicago ballad, made memorable by the fake Madonna and fake Billy Idol in the video.

2. “All I Need” by Jack Wagner

General Hospital knew how to churn out the musicians!Landing at #2 isn’t too shabby for a soap opera actor!

1. “Like a Virgin” by Madonna

Madonna was at the top of her game here as one of the biggest ’80s icons.

 

 

 


Well that wraps up this week’s countdown. I hope you enjoyed it as much as I have. Until next time, Keep your feet on the ground, and keep reaching for the stars.

Remember That Song: 12/27/17

Can you name the artist and song:

You’re not warm or sentimental
You’re so extreme, you can be so temperamental


Last Song: “You Can’t Hurry Love” by Phil Collins from the album Hello I Must Be Going! (1982)

Great job Edzo the Keeper (@edgontarz)!!!

How many heartaches
Must I stand
Before I find the love
To let me live again

If you’d like to purchase this song from Amazon, click on the album cover below:

Top 40 Songs This Week – November 27, 1982: Songs 40-31

Welcome back to another week of some Top 40 music! This time, we Return all the way back to 35 years ago this week. Christmas season had just started, and I was 12 years old. I was past the age of getting kids toys. Instead, it was a time of home video games (in my case, Intellivision), and music. Instead of listening to my parents’ albums, I was beginning to get my own music. I would get cassettes for my birthday and Christmas, and I was constantly listening to the radio. So, the songs this week really bring me back. I hope you feel the same. So let’s Return to the week ending November 27, 1982, and begin this week’s Top 40 countdown.


40. “You Can’t Hurry Love” by Phil Collins

Phil Collins’ cover of The Supremes’ 1966 hit was his first solo #1 hit in the U.K. It would reach #10 in the U.S. This song came off of Collins’ second album, Hello, I Must Be Going!, and proved that he could be mega succcessful as both a solo artist, and as a member of Genesis.

39. “A Penny For Your Thoughts” by Tavares

This Cape Verdean family hail from my home state of Rhode Island. They had several hit songs throughout the ’70s. This song would be their final Top 40 hit, peaking at #33.

38. “Everybody Wants You” by Billy Squier

Even though Billy Squier is known to have fallen off the map not long after MTV was born, this rocker was in heavy rotation during the music channel’s infancy.

37. “What About Me” by Moving Pictures

This was the Australian group’s first number one single in their home country, spending 6 weeks at the top of the charts. It was so successful, that it came over to the U.S., and became a hit there too.

36. “Hand to Hold On To” by John Cougar

This was the third single released from John Cougar’s breakthrough album, American Fool. “Hurts So Good” and “Jack & Diane” are hard acts to follow. But this song isn’t too shabby, and has the same sound as it’s predecessors.

35. “On the Wings of Love” by Jeffrey Osborne

The second Rhode Island act of this countdown! All we need is John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band to complete the trifecta! This is Osborne’s signature song, which came off his self-titled debut album.

34. “You Can Do Magic” by America

This band had it’s heyday in the ’70s, with hits “A Horse With No Name”, “Ventura Highway”, and “Sister Golden Hair”. This song is also pretty damn good. It was a comeback song for the group, but it would be their last Top 40 hit.

33. “Africa” by Toto

This is one of my favorite songs of the ’80s. I could not get enough of this song when it was first released. It is still in heavy rotation on my playlist to this day.

32. “Be My Lady” by Jefferson Starship

Not a bad song as the band transitioned from Jefferson Airplane to Starship. The band jumped aboard the MTV bandwagon early, and were very successful throughout the ’80s.

31. “Down Under” by Men At Work

This Men At Work signature song, and anthem for Australia, is one of the more popular songs of the ’80s. This was a fun video during a fun decade.

 

 


That will wrap things up today. We will continue on with the countdown tomorrow. Where were you at this point in 1982? Did you have any favorite songs here?

Book Review: Not Dead Yet – The Autobiography of Phil Collins

Not Dead Yet – The Autobiography of Phil Collins

by Robert Mishou

It was 1981 and I was sitting in my grandparent’s living room in Valkenburg a/d Geul, the Netherlands. My grandfather and I were waiting for the weekly Saturday soccer highlight show to start and, to fill air time, the station was, as expected, showing music videos. As I watched the first video, I saw a large black and white face begin to fill the screen. The music was quiet – it had an almost foreboding feel to it. I was about to walk away and get a drink, but something made me stay. I watched the video, wondering the entire time what was going on. I did not like the music much, but I did like the singer’s voice and I was intrigued by the song’s haunting sound. I kept watching and the song built a bit and then, seemingly out of nowhere, a burst of drums blasts from the TV. I was taken aback — and hooked. The song was “In the Air Tonight” by Phil Collins, so the Monday, after school, I went to my favorite record store and bought the album Face Value.

This was my first experience with the artist whose career I would follow for the next three decades. I bought every Collins album as soon as each was released – I went back and bought the Genesis albums that he sang on and then bought all future Genesis releases. Don’t believe me? As I look through my music collection now, I see:

Phil Collins albums: Face Value (original and remastered 2015), Hello, I Must Be Going (original and remastered 2015), No Jacket Required (original and remastered 2015), . . . But Seriously (original and remastered 2015), Serious Hits Live, Both Sides (original and remastered 2015), Dance Into the Light, Testify, Love Songs: A Compilation . . .Old and New, Going Back, and The Singles. Yes, both Tarzan and Brother Bear are missing – I just couldn’t.

Genesis albums: A Trick of the Tail, Wind and Wuthering, And Then There WereThree, Duke, Abacab, Genesis, Invisible Touch, We Can’t Dance, Turn It On Again. There are still a few live albums I need to acquire.

phil-collins-albums

You see? I like me some Phil Collins! I do not like all albums equally, in fact, I have been disappointed in a few, but I have never stopped listening to him. When I read, and finally saw, that he was releasing an autobiography, I was excited and a bit nervous. I am a picky reader and I was worried that the writing would not be very good. Also, I did not want my vision of him ruined with “the truth.” Despite my trepidations, I picked up the autobiography, Not Dead Yet, and started reading.

I was not disappointed. The writing is not horrible as he dictated his stories, organized them, and put them in written form – the book sounds like Collins is talking to you. He has a clever sense of humor and tries his best to be honest. This is difficult as he has been married three time which, as a whole he takes responsibility for his role in the ending of all three marriages (although, presently Collins and his third wife are back together, but not married). Collins organizes his stories chronologically starting with his childhood days, his time with Genesis as a drummer and then vocalist, his solo career, and his comeback. The stories are real and full of insights on how some of his great songs were created. This is by no means an expose, but Collins does broach some touchy situations with professionalism and no true axe to grind.

I do want everyone to read Not Dead Yet, so I am not going to give away all of the cool stuff, but I do want to intrigue you all a bit, so what follows are a few interesting tidbits from Collins’ book.

Collins’ interest in show business started with acting. He attended a fine arts performance high school and wanted to be an actor. As a boy, he played the Artful Dodger in Oliver. Clearly, he pursued a career as a drummer and played in several bands before joining Genesis. This acting bug resurfaced when Collins stared in Buster and made appearances in Miami Vice and Hook.

Collins hesitantly replaced Peter Gabriel as the lead vocalist of Genesis. After auditioning many potential vocalists, Tony Banks (keyboards) and Mike Rutherford (guitars) encouraged Collins to try the lead vocals. Everyone liked what they heard and the rest is history. Collins did not think he could be the lead vocalist and play drums for the band in concert. So, when performing live, Chester Thompson played drums while Collins was the front man. Collins maintained Thompson for his live solo shows. During all Genesis and solo shows, there would be segments (mostly instrumentals) in the show where Collins would jump back on the drum kit. Despite all of the many things Collins did during his career, he always came back to drumming as his ultimate love.

“In the Air Tonight” has nothing to do with witnessing a drowning. It is a bitter song about the breakup of his first marriage. “Well, if you told me you were drowning / I would not lend a hand / I’ve seen your face before my friend / But I don’t know if you know who I am” is nothing more than some really hard feelings about the way that first marriage ended. Collins is fully aware now that the constant touring and recording schedule that Genesis maintained was a recipe to end any marriage, but he was totally driven by the work.

The Genesis song “Since I Lost You “ from the We Can’t Dance album was written for his good friend Eric Clapton, whose son died in a tragic accident. Collins played it for him, asking his permission to include it on the album, saying that he would gladly drop it if Clapton did not approve. Clapton loved it and played “Tears in Heaven” for Collins; both men cried with each other that night and remain good friends today. Clapton appears on the Collins albums Face Value and . . . But Seriously.
“Since I Lost You”:

“I Wish it Would Rain Down”:

The title to Collins’ #1 hit “Sussudio” from No Jacket Required means nothing! Both as a solo artist and as a member of Genesis, the writing of the songs came in a similar manner. The musicians would be in a room together and play. The music was almost always written before any lyrics came about. While working on No Jacket Required, Collins was working on the music and, as was typical, needed to improvise lyrics. He used the word “sussudio” as a place holder. The song started to take shape and lyrics were added, but “sussudio” fit so well he decided to leave it.

One last one: Many people have said that there is some contention between Peter Gabriel and Phil Collins after he replaced him as Genesis lead vocalist. Collins insists that this is not true. He feels that he and Gabriel are still good friends as was evident when the original members reunited for a BBC documentary Genesis: Together and Apart.

 

Documentary (1 ½ hours long):

For ‘80s music fans Not Dead Yet is a must read. It is full of insights to Collins’ creative process as a member of Genesis and as a solo artist. Collins discusses all of his big songs and how they came to be. One more note: Both “Against All Odds” and “Separate Lives” (both #1 hits) could not make the cut for a Collins album and sat on the shelf for some time until given to the soundtracks of Against All Odds and White Knights respectively. The book reads well and is an evenly told autobiography. Yes, there a few things that could use a little more explanation, but Collins does not avoid touchy or embarrassing situations. He is, for example, very honest about his role in the debacle of performing in London and Philadelphia for Live Aid. The book did not talk me out of my Phil Collins fandom, rather, it may have increased it. Collins is performing a Not Dead Yet tour in Europe in 2017. There are rumors that he will bring this tour to the U.S. – one can only hope. Not Dead Yet end optimistically, giving the reader hope that his fantastic musical career continues.

 

not-dead-yet

Remember That Song: 3/17/16

Can you name the artist and song:

See the stone set in your eyes
See the thorn twist in your side
I wait for you


Last Song: “In the Air Tonight” by Phil Collins from Face Value (1981)

Great job Robert (@mishouenglish) and Jim (@JimVilk)!!!

So you can wipe off that grin,
I know where you’ve been
It’s all been a pack of lies

Remember That Song: 2/2/16

Can you name the artist and song:

If I could go back again
Well, I know I’d never let you go
Back with all of my friends
To that wonderful


Last Song: “Sussudio” by Phil Collins from No Jacket Required (1985)

Great job Robert (@mishouenglish)!!!

Oh, if she called me I’d be there
I’d come running anywhere
She’s all I need, all my life
I feel so good if I just say the word

Deep Tracks: Phil Collins – That’s Just the Way It Is

Today, Robert wraps up this week’s Phil Collins Deep Tracks. I hope you enjoyed these as much as I have. To be honest, the only song I was familiar with was yesterday’s (“Long Long Way to Go”). It is always great to discover great music! Thanks so much, Robert!


That’s Just the Way It Is (1989)

Here is another song that is similar to yesterday’s: serious lyrics and a famous background vocalist, this time it is David Crosby (in 1993 Collins would record “Hero” with Crosby for his solo album). Musically, this is a somber tune that matches the lyrics perfectly. The song is about feuds or long standing disagreements that continue through many generations costing many lives along the way. While no specific conflict is mentioned in the song, one of the conflicts that this could easily be about is the fighting that existed between Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland. This generational fighting existed for hundreds of years and saw no real peaceful solution until the late 1990s. This conflict clearly had a direct effect on Northern Ireland, but it also extended to England due Northern Ireland being a part of the United Kingdom and that many of the Protestants were of English descent. The fight has truly been passed down through multiple generations, “It’s been your life for as long as you can remember / But you cannot fight no more / You must want to look your son in the eyes / When he asks you what you did it for.” The frustration lies in the idea that this fighting could stop at any time. Unfortunately, it has always been this way – it is what is expected, “Young men come and young men go / But life goes on just the same. . . That’s just the way it is.” The futile nature of the conflict is clear as is Collins’ frustration with the continued loss of life.


Beginning on January 29, Phil Collins will begin re-releasing his solo albums. Each package will include a digitally remastered original album and a second disc full of live versions, demos, and previously unreleased versions. All of the album covers will be re-shot in the same design as the originals, but with a new image of Collins’ face. The first two releases will be Face Value and Both Sides with the other albums being released throughout 2016. These releases mark the official “un-retiring” of Collins who, at the end of 2015, announced his return to touring and making new music.